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I have an enum like:

enum E
{
    TYPE_FLOAT,
    TYPE_CHAR,
    TYPE_INT
}

And I want to create a compile-time mapping to get the appropriate E for a type like:

GetE<float> // returns TYPE_FLOAT
GetE<char> // returns TYPE_CHAR
GetE<int> // returns TYPE_INT

I thought of:

template<class T> struct GetE;

template<> struct GetE<float> { static constexpr E type = TYPE_FLOAT; };
template<> struct GetE<char> { static constexpr E type = TYPE_CHAR; };
template<> struct GetE<int> { static constexpr E type = TYPE_INT; };

But I'm getting errors like:

undefined reference to `GetE<int>::type'

Whats the best way to do this? And why the error?

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It depends on how you use these constant expressions.

The ODR (one-definition rule) states that

(§3.2/2) [...] A variable whose name appears as a potentially-evaluated expression is odr-used unless it is an object that satisfies the requirements for appearing in a constant expression (5.19) and the lvalue-to-rvalue conversion (4.1) is immediately applied. [...]

(And then, lots of special rules, exceptions and exceptions of the exceptions follow.)

Any variable that is odr-used, must have exactly one definition. Your constant expressions have a declaration, but not a definition, so this goes well unless you odr-use one of them.

For example, the following goes well:

int main() {
  E e = GetE<float>::type;
  return 0;
}

But this does not:

void f(const E &)
{ }

int main() {
  f(GetE<float>::type);
  return 0;
}

because f requires a (const) reference, so the lvalue-to-rvalue conversion cannot be applied immediately, hence this constitutes an odr-use. The compiler will complain that it misses a definition.

(Remark. As ShafikYaghmour found (see the comments), you may not get a complaint if the compiler uses optimization, as the references may be optimized away. To reproduce the compiler complaint, use the -O0 flag (or similar, depending on the compiler).)

To solve the problem, the required definition can be provided in the usual way, i.e. outside the struct-definition:

constexpr E GetE<float>::type;
constexpr E GetE<char>::type;
constexpr E GetE<int>::type;

But since this would have to happen in the .cpp (not the header file), you'll end up having to maintain the declarations and definitions in two different places, which is cumbersome.

The solution you've just suggested in your comment, i.e. define a constexpr (and inline) function, sounds right:

template <class T> constexpr E GetE();

template <> constexpr E GetE<float>()
{ return TYPE_FLOAT; }

template <> constexpr E GetE<char>()
{ return TYPE_CHAR; }

template <> constexpr E GetE<int>()
{ return TYPE_INT; }

void f(const E &)
{ }

int main() {
  E e = GetE<float>();

  f(GetE<float>());

  return 0;
}
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1  
Yeah this sounds reasonable. I've changed to using a function template like tmpl<class A> E GetE() and then specializing that instead and this has fixed it. Thanks. –  Andrew Tomazos Feb 27 '13 at 13:52
1  
@jogojapan I am trying to learn from your comment but I am not seeing an error using the last piece of code: liveworkspace.org/code/4oTEis What am I missing? Thank you –  Shafik Yaghmour Feb 27 '13 at 13:59
1  
@ShafikYaghmour It's because of the -O2 compiler flag. It optimizes the references away. Good comment, though, I shall mention this in the answer. –  jogojapan Feb 27 '13 at 14:04
1  
@jogojapan Thank you, both of your replies were on the mark, either removing -O2 or using e within the body of function causes the error to appear. –  Shafik Yaghmour Feb 27 '13 at 14:14
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Static member variables need to be defined outside the class scope:

class C {
    const static int x = 5;
};

decltype(C::x) C::x;
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Even if its constexpr? That's weird. –  Andrew Tomazos Feb 27 '13 at 13:44
    
Well, on GCC 4.7 it works. Maybe it's just your compiler? –  Bartek Banachewicz Feb 27 '13 at 13:48
    
using 4.7.2 as well. –  Andrew Tomazos Feb 27 '13 at 13:50
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Maybe because you forgot to put a semicolon after the enum definition, this works for me in LiveWorkSpace:

#include <iostream>

enum E
{
   TYPE_FLOAT,
   TYPE_CHAR,
   TYPE_INT
} ;

template<class T> struct GetE;

template<> struct GetE<float> { static constexpr E type = TYPE_FLOAT; };
template<> struct GetE<char> { static constexpr E type = TYPE_CHAR; };
template<> struct GetE<int> { static constexpr E type = TYPE_INT; };

int main()
{
    std::cout << GetE<int>::type << std::endl ;
}

here is a link to the code http://liveworkspace.org/code/nHqUe$6

share|improve this answer
    
no in real code I have semicolon. Hmmm strange. I'm also using 4.7.2. Not sure whats going on. Thanks. –  Andrew Tomazos Feb 27 '13 at 13:47
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