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Giving a map of id and string paths, i need to parse and build an xml doc.

1) Here is the map of paths with ids (collected from database):

def trees = [:]
trees.put(1,"TEST/folder1")
trees.put(2,"TEST/folder2")
trees.put(3,"TEST/folder1/folder1.1")
trees.put(4,"TEST/folder2/folder2.1/folder2.1.2")
trees.put(5,"TEST/folder1/folder1.2") 
trees.put(6,"TEST/folder1/folder1.2/folder1.2.1/")                        
trees.put(7,"TEST/folder1/folder1.2/folder1.2.2/")
trees.put(8,"TEST/folder1/folder1.2/folder1.2.2/1.2.2.1")       

2) Closure definition

def parseTreeNodes(HashMap<Integer,String> t) {
    def treeNodes = [:]
    def nodeItems = []
    def subItems=[]
    t.each { k,v ->
        subItems = v.split('/')
        subItems.eachWithIndex { node,i ->
            if(!treeNodes.values().contains(node)) {
                treeNodes.put(id:k,[depth:i,node:node,parent:subItems[i-1]])
            }
        }
    }
    println treeNodes.toString() + "---"
}

3) Call the closure

parseTreeNodes(trees)

How to apply an xml transform to this filter so as to get an xml doc as output whithout duplicates?

4) Is there a groovy way to convert the xml tree to get attributes with name and id (extracted from the first iteration) ???

<folder name="folder1" id="1" depth="1">
      <folder name="folder1.2" id="2" path="folder1/folder1.2" depth="2"/>
 <folder> 
...

In fact, the following map has already all the datas:

def treeNodes = [:]
     trees.each { k,v ->
                    subItems = v.split('/')
                    subItems.eachWithIndex { node,i ->
                        if(!treeNodes.values().contains(node)) {
                            treeNodes.put(id:k,[depth:i,node:node,parent:subItems[i-1]])
                        }
                    }
                }
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1  
You are adding 4 things under the same key 5... is this intentional? –  tim_yates Feb 27 '13 at 14:46
    
No, i've fixed. Thanks. –  ludo_rj Feb 28 '13 at 0:50
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could do something like this to generate a map of folders:

// Build a map of folders (see https://gist.github.com/kiy0taka/2478499)
def rslt = { [:].withDefault{ owner.call() } }().with { t ->
  trees.each { k, v ->
    v.tokenize( '/' ).inject( t ) { tr, i -> tr[ i ] }
  }
  t
}

Then something like this to convert the map of maps to xml

// Taken from https://gist.github.com/uehaj/875631
sw = new StringWriter()
new groovy.xml.MarkupBuilder(sw).with {
  visitor = { k, v -> "$k" { v instanceof Map ? v.collect(visitor) : mkp.yield(v) } }
  root { rslt.collect visitor }
}

So now calling:

println sw.toString()

prints:

<root>
  <TEST>
    <folder1>
      <folder1.1 />
      <folder1.2>
        <folder1.2.2>
          <1.2.2.1 />
        </folder1.2.2>
      </folder1.2>
    </folder1>
    <folder2>
      <folder2.1>
        <folder2.1.2 />
      </folder2.1>
    </folder2>
  </TEST>
</root>
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, great show of visitor pattern ! works great... Thanks. To complete the power of groovy i can send it to json object. –  ludo_rj Feb 27 '13 at 15:25
    
@user2115767 json is easier, just do new groovy.json.JsonBuilder( rslt ).toPrettyString() –  tim_yates Feb 27 '13 at 15:31
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