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I'm trying to define a generic conversion operator from a string to an Enum, and I'd like to use it like this:

let day = asEnum<DayOfWeek>("Monday")

But with this implementation:

let asEnum<'a, 'b when 'a: (new : unit -> 'a) and 'a : struct and 'a :> ValueType and 'a : enum<'b>> text = 
    match Enum.TryParse<'a>(text)  with
    | true, value -> Some value
    | false, _ -> None

I can only use it like this:

    let day = asEnum<DayOfWeek,_>("Monday")

or this:

    let day:DayOfWeek option = asEnum("Monday")

If I omit the 'a : enum<'b> altogether from the type constraint, I can have it as I want, but then if someone doesn't specify the type it will default to int, which I really don't like, I'd prefer it to give a compile time error like it does when I specify a constraint

Maybe there's any trick to just specify one type parameter and have the other one infered? Any ideas?

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3 Answers

How about this?

let asEnum s :'a option when 'a:enum<'b> =
    match System.Enum.TryParse s with
    | true, v -> Some v
    | _ -> None

// works, but warns that type params shouldn't be given explicitly
asEnum<System.Reflection.BindingFlags,_> "DeclaredOnly"    
// also okay
(asEnum "DeclaredOnly" : System.Reflection.BindingFlags option)
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Holy cow. I didn't even know that was valid syntax. I think if you change it to 'a:enum<int> that will give him what he wants. He could also do let e : System.Reflection.BindingFlags option = asEnum "DeclaredOnly" to avoid the warning. –  Daniel Feb 27 '13 at 15:55
    
Why does this work, yet putting the same constraint between < > doesn't? –  Daniel Feb 27 '13 at 15:57
    
@Daniel - I don't think @ovastus wants int to be forced, he wants it to be inferred if possible (which it is). –  kvb Feb 27 '13 at 16:13
    
That's much nicer on the implementation side, but at the usage side, it's actually worse, as in addition to not still having to specify the _ extra type argument, it always give a warning :( I'm trying to optimize the usage, even if the definition of asEnum is very clunky. Still cool that you don't have to spit it all out when putting outside <> –  Gustavo Guerra Feb 27 '13 at 16:17
    
@ovatsus: What usage are you hoping for? –  Daniel Feb 27 '13 at 16:19
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Unfortunately, in order to augment the constraint it seems you have to spell it all out: (as kvb pointed out, you can avoid duplicating the constraints on TryParse by adding the 'T : enum<int> constraint outside the angle brackets)

This also works:

let asEnum<'T 
  when 'T : enum<int>
  and 'T : struct
  and 'T :> ValueType
  and 'T : (new : unit -> 'T)> text =
  match Enum.TryParse<'T>(text) with
  | true, value -> Some value
  | _ -> None

This gives a compile-time error if the underlying type isn't int:

type ByteEnum =
  | None = 0uy

asEnum<ByteEnum> "None" //ERROR: The type 'int' does not match the type 'byte'
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Another thing I tried was this:

type AsEnum = 

    static member Get<'a, 'b when 'a: (new : unit -> 'a) and 'a : struct and 'a :> ValueType and 'a : enum<int>> (text:string) =

        match Enum.TryParse<'a>(text) with
        | true, value -> Some value
        | _ -> None

    static member Get<'a, 'b when 'a: (new : unit -> 'a) and 'a : struct and 'a :> ValueType and 'a : enum<int64>> (text:string) =

        match Enum.TryParse<'a>(text) with
        | true, value -> Some value
        | _ -> None

let a = AsEnum.Get<BindingFlags>.Get "DeclaredOnly"   

to try to see if I could get the compiler to infer which overload to call, but if fails with an ambiguity error

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