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Can we find setter method name using property name?

I have a dynamically generated map<propertyName,propertyValue>

By using the key from map (which is propertyName) I need to invoke the appropriate setter method for object and pass the value from map (which is propertyValue).

class A {
    String name;
    String age;

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }
    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
    public String getCompany() {
        return company;
    }
    public void setCompany(String company) {
        this.company = company;
    }
}

My map contain two items:

map<"name","jack">
map<"company","inteld">

Now I am iterating the map and as I proceed with each item from map, based on key (either name or company) I need to call appropriate setter method of class A e.g. for first item I get name as key so need to call new A().setName.

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5 Answers 5

Although this is possible to do using reflection, you might be better off using commons-beanutils. You could easily use the setSimpleProperty() method like so:

PropertyUtils.setSimpleProperty(a, entry.getKey(), entry.getValue());

Assuming a is of type A.

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nice suggestion! –  vikingsteve Feb 27 '13 at 15:00

If you use Spring then you'll likely want to use the BeanWrapper. (If not, you might consider using it.)

Map map = new HashMap();
map.put("name","jack");
map.put("company","inteld");

BeanWrapper wrapper = new BeanWrapperImpl(A.class);
wrapper.setPropertyValues(map);
A instance = wrapper.getWrappedInstance();

This is easier than using reflection directly because Spring will do common type conversions for you. (It will also honor Java property editors so you can register custom type converters for the ones it doesn't handle.)

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Reflection API is what you need. Let's assume that you know the property name and you have an object a of type A:

 String propertyName = "name";
 String methodName = "set" + StringUtils.capitalize(propertyName);
 a.getClass().getMethod(methodName, newObject.getClass()).invoke(a, newObject);

Ofcourse, you will be asked to handle some exceptions.

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2  
Exceptions, yes, but also caching the results of the reflection look-up. Note, too, that this suggestion requires that the setter take a known parameter type (String), which is fine if you're just using known parameter types, but potentially wrong if you are using other objects (especially where inheritance is involved). This is why something like beanutils or Spring's BeanWrapper are worth a look. –  ig0774 Feb 27 '13 at 15:19

You could get the setter method like this:

A a = new A();
String name = entry.getKey();
Field field = A.class.getField(name);
String methodName = "set" + name.substring(0, 1).toUpperCase() + name.substring(1);
Method setter = bw.getBeanClass().getMethod(methodName, (Class<?>) field.getType());
setter.invoke(a, entry.getValue());

But it would only work for your A class. If you had a class that extended a base class then the class.getField(name) would not work already.

You should take a peek at the BeanWrapper in Juffrou-reflect. It's more performant than Springframework's and allows you to to your map-bean transformation and a lot more.

Disclaimer: I am the guy who develops Juffrou-reflect. And if you have any questions on how to use it, i'll be more than happy to respond.

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I think you can probably do that with reflection, a simpler solution is doing string comparison on the key and invoke the appropriate method:

 String key = entry.getKey();
 if ("name".equalsIgnoreCase(key))
   //key
 else
   // company
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This isn't a maintainable approach and should only be done for quick-and-dirty initialization. –  Alan Krueger Feb 27 '13 at 15:24

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