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I'm experiencing java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space whenever I try to execute my code. However, if I close my streams in certain instances the error goes away, but because my streams are closing prematurely I'm missing data.

I'm very new to Java and I'm clearly not understanding how to manage the streams. How and when should I close streams?

private void handleFile(File source)
{
    FileInputStream fis = null;

    try
    {
        if(source.isFile())
        {
            fis = new FileInputStream(source);
            handleFile(source.getAbsolutePath(), fis);
        }
        else if(source.isDirectory())
        {
            for(File file:source.listFiles())
            {
               if(file.isFile())
               {
                   fis = new FileInputStream(file);
                   handleFile(file, fis);
               }
               else
               {
                   handleFile(file);
               }
            }
         }
     }
     catch(IOException ioe)
     {
         ioe.printStackTrace();
     }
     finally
     {
         try
         {
             if(fis != null) { fis.close(); }
         }
         catch(IOException ioe) { ioe.printStackTrace(); }
     }
}

private handleFile(String fileName, InputStream inputStream)
{
    try
    {
       byte[] initialBytes = isToByteArray(inputStream);
       byte[] finalBytes = initialBytes;

       if(initialBytes.length == 0) return;

       if(isBytesTypeB(initialBytes))
       {
          finalBytes = getBytesTypeB(startingBytes);
       }
       // Other similar method checks
       // .....

       map.put(fileName, finalBytes);
     }
     catch(IOException ioe)
     {
         ioe.printStackTrace();
     }
}

private byte[] isToByteArray(InputStream inputStream)
{
    ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
    byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];

    int nRead;
    while((nRead = inputStream.read(buffer)) != -1)
    {
        baos.write(buffer, 0, nRead);
    }
    return baos.toByteArray();
 }

 private boolean isBytesTypeB(byte[] fileBytes)
 {
     // Checks if these bytes match a particular type
     if(BytesMatcher.matches(fileBytes, fileBytes.length))
     {
         return true;
     }
     return false;
 }

 private byte[] getBytesTypeB(byte[] fileBytes)
 {
     //decompress bytes

     return decompressedBytes;
 }
share|improve this question
1  
How big are your files, combined? –  Ingo Feb 27 '13 at 16:00
    
No more than 5 - 10 Mb. –  inquisitor Feb 27 '13 at 16:00
    
Ohh.. combined. I'm not sure. I'm running my program against a directory, reading in the bytes of each file, doing something with those bytes and then storing the fileName and an object that did something with those bytes into a map. –  inquisitor Feb 27 '13 at 16:05
2  
You should close all your streams once done with reading. Observe that when you read the files in a directory, the streams are not closed. –  Ingo Feb 27 '13 at 16:05
1  
You should close your Inputstream fis in the handleFile function after your operation –  Shashank Kadne Feb 27 '13 at 16:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all, do not read the entire streams in memory. Use buffers when reading and writing.

Use ByteArrayInputStream and ByteArrayInputStream only if you're sure you'll be reading very small streams (whose data you will need to re-use for some operations) and it really makes sense to keep the data in memory. Otherwise, you will quickly (or unexpectedly) run out of memory.

Define the streams outside a try-catch block and close them in the finally block (if they are not null). For example:

void doSomeIOStuff() throws IOException
{
    InputStream is = null;

    try
    {
        is = new MyInputStream(...);
        // Do stuff
    }
    catch (IOException ioExc)
    {
        // Either just inform (poor decision, but good for illustration):
        ioExc.printStackTrace();
        // Or re-throw to delegate further on:
        throw new IOException(ioExc);
    }
    finally
    {
        if (is != null)
        {
            is.close();
        }
    }
}

This way your resources are always properly closed after use.

Out of curiosity, what should the handleFile(...) method really be doing?

share|improve this answer
    
carlspring, thank you for that very informative post! I'm definitely doing something with those bytes as they will be used to instantiate a class that does calculations against those bytes. The object of that class is then saved into a map. –  inquisitor Feb 27 '13 at 16:12
    
Oh, the handleFile method will also accept a stream because in another method (which I didn't type) I'm recursively checking archive files and passing their stream to the handleFile method. –  inquisitor Feb 27 '13 at 16:17
1  
Well, the code you have shown looks right. From what I understand, you intend to be doing decompressing. I might make more sense to have a look at the ByteBuffer and memory-mapping classes in java.nio. The problem with what you're doing is that you need to know prior to starting the JVM what sort of memory you would be expecting to use. For example, if you know this would be a single-threaded application reading files no larger than X mb, then it would make sense to start the JVM with something like Y=X+{a-bit-more-ram}, using -XmxYm (f.ex.: -Xmx1024m). –  carlspring Feb 27 '13 at 16:27

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