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I'm writing code for a genetic algorithm, and I'm stuck at a point where I can't free unused memory. This is my main() code:

    szChromosomes = initial_population(&data[0]);
while (iCurrentGen <= data->m_iMaxGenerations)
{
    arrfSelectedChromosomes = selection(&data[0], szChromosomes);
    iSelectedLen = order_descending_grid(arrfSelectedChromosomes);
    szAuxGen = crossover(&data[0], arrfSelectedChromosomes, szChromosomes);
    free_generation(&data[0], szChromosomes);//Error line
    szChromosomes = szAuxGen;
    szAuxGen = NULL;
}

initial_population(&data[0]) creates the szChromosomes array (which I try to free later) like this:

char** initial_population(struct INPUT_DATA* d)
{
int i, j = 0;
float fMember = 0.0;
char** szChromosomes = (char**)malloc(d->m_iPopulationSize * sizeof(char*));

srand(time(NULL));
for (i = 0; i < d->m_iPopulationSize; ++i)
{
    szChromosomes[i] = (char*)malloc(d->m_iBitsPChromosome * sizeof(char));
    for (j = 0; j < d->m_iBitsPChromosome; ++j)
    {
        szChromosomes[i][j] = rand_1_0(0.0, 1.0) == 1? '1' : '0';
    }
    szChromosomes[i][j] = '\0';
}

return szChromosomes;

}

When I call the free_generation function, the For loop below gets executed:

    int i;

for (i = 0; i < d->m_iPopulationSize; ++i)
{
    free(szChromosomes[i]);
}

free(szChromosomes);
szChromosomes = NULL;

When the first call to free(szChromosomes[i]); takes place, I get the following error:

HEAP CORRUPTION DETECTED: after normal block (#99). CRT detected that the application wrote to memory after end of heap buffer.

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Try (char*)malloc(d->m_iBitsPChromosome + 1);. You need an extra character for '\0' in the end. Multiplication by sizeof(char) is redundant as char defined by the standard to have a size of 1 byte. –  n.m. Feb 27 '13 at 16:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
char** initial_population(struct INPUT_DATA* d)
{
int i, j = 0;
float fMember = 0.0;
char** szChromosomes = (char**)malloc(d->m_iPopulationSize * sizeof(char*));

srand(time(NULL));
for (i = 0; i < d->m_iPopulationSize; ++i)
{
    szChromosomes[i] = (char*)malloc(d->m_iBitsPChromosome * sizeof(char));
    for (j = 0; j < d->m_iBitsPChromosome; ++j)
    {
        szChromosomes[i][j] = rand_1_0(0.0, 1.0) == 1? '1' : '0';
    }
    szChromosomes[i][j] = '\0';
}

return szChromosomes;

You insert a '\0' at the end of each string szChromosomes[i] but only use malloc with a length of d->m_iBitsPChromosome

So you try to write too far in the memory. To change that just change your 2nd malloc to:

szChromosomes[i] = (char*)malloc((d->m_iBitsPChromosome + 1) * sizeof(char));
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That was the problem an extra byte for the \0 character! I can't believe I missed it by that much! thank you guys! –  Jorge Cespedes Feb 27 '13 at 16:36
szChromosomes[i][j] = '\0';

this line writes to memory you do not own.

For eg. take this example

char * p;
p = malloc(2);
p[0] = 'a';
p[1] = 'b';

You should not be doing

p[2] = '\0'

after this because you have allocated only 2 bytes, but you are writing to 3 bytes.

You can fix this 2 ways

  1. Do you need the '\0'. Unless, you are going to use one of the functions from <string.h> which expects a '\0' to check the end, you need to terminate it by '\0'. In your own code which traverses the array, you can traverse using a for loop which ends at ctr < d->m_iBitsPChromosome.

  2. Or you can allocate malloc(d->m_iBitsPChromosome + 1)

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