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Is O(5n) = 5*O(n) ? From what I understand , O(5n) == O(n). Thus they are not equal? Please correct me if I am wrong.

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What is 5 * { Droider } ? Without special definition of operator * for sets (or for big O notations at least), the two questions (your and mine) both does not make any sense. Of course you can define g(n)*O(f(n)) = O(f(n) * g(n)), and then it makes perfect sense, but you have to first define it. AFAIK, there is no standard definition for this operation. –  amit Feb 27 '13 at 16:23
    
i get it , thanks –  h4ck3d Feb 27 '13 at 16:24
    
Runtime is proportional to five times the input size. How would you represent this in big-O notation? –  h4ck3d Feb 28 '13 at 11:25

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You only care the asymptotic behavior of the function and if f(x)/g(x) converges to a constant the two functions are defined to belong to the same big-O class. So as 5*n / n is always 5. So O(n) = O(5*n).

As for your question: O(f(x)) is defined as the set of functions having the same asymptotic behavior as f(x) and thus 5*O(N) is not defined. There is no such thing.

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But my question is , Is O(5n) = 5*O(n) ? –  h4ck3d Feb 27 '13 at 16:23
    
It does not addresses the question (which is not well defined, but still does not address it). The question was NOT if O(5n) == O(n), but for 5*O(n). –  amit Feb 27 '13 at 16:25
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O(n) can be seen as a the set of linear algorithm running times. So 5*O(n) is not defined, and thus O(5n) != 5*O(n). –  Chiel92 Feb 27 '13 at 16:27
    
@Chiel92 Actually, O(n) is a set of functions, not algorithms, and it is not limited to having an algorithm with this running time. Also note, it also includes sub-linear functions. –  amit Feb 27 '13 at 16:28
    
@amit 5 *O(N) is not defined! O(N) is a set, not a value. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Feb 27 '13 at 16:29

You're correct, O(5n) is indeed equal to O(n). 5*O(n) doesn't make sense, O doesn't return a result, it is a notation. So you can't multiply it with a number.

Although there are some definitions where Big O is used inside formulas, for example error terms. But it has to be defined like this beforehand.

Here the wikipedia link describing O(c*n) = O(n).

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Runtime is proportional to five times the input size. How would you represent this in big-O notation? –  h4ck3d Feb 28 '13 at 11:25

O(5n) = 5*O(n)

As stated, this is not defined.

I suggest you (re)read at least the Wikipedia article on the subject.

"f(x) = O(g(x)) as x -> infinite" means (informal intuitive definition): "f is bounded above by g asymptotically up to a constant factor". See the article above for a formal definition.

O(5n) == O(n).

I think this is more correct ("as x -> infinite" implied): f(x) = O(x) <=> f(x) = O(5x)

Cheers!

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Runtime is proportional to five times the input size. How would you represent this in big-O notation? –  h4ck3d Feb 28 '13 at 11:25
    
I'd simply say that your function is O(n) as n -> infinite. Because if it is proportional to five times the input size, it is also proportional to the input size. So saying your function f(n) is O(5n) is equivalent to saying that your function f(n) is O(n). The later says the same thing and is simpler in my opinion. –  Sébastien RoccaSerra Feb 28 '13 at 12:19

What is 5 * { Droider }?

Without special definition of operator * for sets (or for big O notations at least), the two questions (your and mine) both does not make any sense.
Of course you can define g(n)*O(f(n)) = O(f(n) * g(n)), and then it makes perfect sense, but you have to first define it.
AFAIK, there is no standard definition for this operation.

With the above definition we get 5*O(n) = O(5*n) = O(n), and your assumption is correct.

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Runtime is proportional to five times the input size. How would you represent this in big-O notation? O(5n) or 5*O(n) ? –  h4ck3d Feb 28 '13 at 11:26
    
@Droider O(n) still represents "proportional to five times the input size", big O notation doesn't give you a way to tell denote it –  amit Feb 28 '13 at 16:19

Mathematically O(5N) != O(N) but when it comes to algorithms your care about effeciency or in other words the complexity of the algorithm, so you care more about the varaible N so O(5N) == O(N) as in equally effecient (or complex).

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Mathematically, O(5N) = O(N) by definition of big-O notation. (Well, not exactly by definition, but you can prove it in about 2 lines) –  amit Feb 27 '13 at 16:31

what matters in variables growth rates. Adding, Substracting, Multiplying or divising by any Constant number doent change them.

Thus any constant is insignificant and can be ommited without losing accuracy.

Regarding your question - O(5n) = O(n) = 5*O(n)

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That means , O(5n) = O(n) < 5*O(n) ? –  h4ck3d Feb 27 '13 at 16:23
    
no: O(5n) = O(n) = 5*O(n), what matters in variables growth rates. Adding, Substracting,Multiplying or division by any Constant number doent change them –  Nogard Feb 27 '13 at 16:26

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