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I have 2 piece of code that I would like to know the reason for using either one.Both works but which is a good practice in C?

Option 1

Void GoodPractice()
{
  bool flag;

  if (right)
  {
    flag=1;
  }
  else
  {
    flag=0;
  }
}

OR

Option 2

Void GoodPractice()
{
  bool flag=0;

  if (right)
  {
    flag=1;
  }
}

Let me know why as well. Thanks.

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closed as not constructive by Robert Harvey Feb 27 '13 at 16:36

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umm... these don't do anthing, maybe your real question is if this flag is returned from function? –  Hogan Feb 27 '13 at 16:32
    
in this case is just a readability matter –  Massimiliano Peluso Feb 27 '13 at 16:33
3  
flag and right seem to be the same thing. –  Anirudh Ramanathan Feb 27 '13 at 16:34
    
with initializaton,option two looks much more cleaner way to it.. –  Travis G Feb 27 '13 at 16:34
1  
#define GoodPractice(x) (x) ? True : False, use it: bool flag = GoodPractice(right); –  wildplasser Feb 27 '13 at 17:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It depends on what you want to do.

In general second version is better than the first one, because there is no code section where flag is not defined.

Void GoodPractice()
{
   bool flag=0;
   // you can use flag  
   if (right)
   {
      flag=1;
   }
}

Void NotAsGoodPractice()
{
   bool flag;
   // you can't use flag, because it has no defined value
   if (right)
   {
      flag=1;
   }
   else
       flag=0;
}
share|improve this answer

Neither...

void GoodPractice()
{
  bool flag = right;

  // though I would return it  ;)
}
share|improve this answer

Both of these code examples are functionally equivalent, so the real difference is a mater of style.

However, there could be a case where one is clearer than the other.

For example in a short function the second option is clear but the second option would be less clear if there is a lot of code between the bool flag=0 and the if statement.

I've used both exactly for these type of reasons. Look at the code, which seems clearer to you.

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bool flag = right != 0; // if you want to be more explicit
share|improve this answer
    
The second example will work, but not necessarily the first. In C, right can be something other than a bool, but still work in a comparison. –  Robert Harvey Feb 27 '13 at 16:34
    
He used right in if condition so it is convertable to bool –  Slava Feb 27 '13 at 16:35
    
The second solution is the only safe, portable one. I would +1 if you had omitted the first rather bad solution. –  Carey Gregory Feb 28 '13 at 3:00

In my humble opinion , i feel this is better.

Void GoodPractice()
 {
 bool flag;

  if (right)
  {
    flag=1;
  }
  else
  {
    flag=0;
  }
}

Yes it increases the number of lines of codes , and may take an extra CPU cycle or two.

But i feel , there can be less chances of making an error , by writing code in a clear way , that covers all possible logic types.

share|improve this answer
    
Why is the second example unclear? –  Robert Harvey Feb 27 '13 at 16:36
    
@RobertHarvey It is clear in this scenario , but may not be if there is several lines of code separating declaration of flag , and conditional testing of flag , because you may forget to initialize flag to zero , or some code in between may change the value of flag. Happened once or twice with me. –  Beagle Bone Feb 27 '13 at 16:41
1  
Ah, you're one of those "always use braces, even when there's only one line of code" guys. :) –  Robert Harvey Feb 27 '13 at 16:42
    
Sorry, but I don't see how 8 lines of code are more clear than the single line flag = right != 0;. –  Carey Gregory Feb 28 '13 at 2:56

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