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How can I remove the tail element of a priority queue? I am trying to implement beam search using a priority queue and once the priority queue is full, I want to remove the last element(the element with the least priority).

Thanks!

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1  
You can create a new PriorityQueue instance and move all the elements from the initial queue to the new one except for the tail. –  Luiggi Mendoza Feb 27 '13 at 16:34
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stackoverflow.com/questions/7878026/… –  NPE Feb 27 '13 at 16:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No easy way. Copy elements from original to new except the last.

PriorityQueue removelast(PriorityQueue pq)
{

    PriorityQueue pqnew;

    while(pq.size() > 1)
    {
        pqnew.add(pq.poll());
    }

    pq.clear();
    return pqnew;
}

called as

pq = removelast(pq);
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If you are concerned with the runtime, I suggest implementing your own queue. I did the following and worked in my project.

1) copy paste the code from PriorityQueue -> CustomQueue.java 2) Add a method removeLast() 3) This is the implementation I used (very minimal)

public void removeLast() {
    if(size == 0) {
       return;
    }
    queue[size - 1] = null;
    size--;

}

The reason this works is that the implementation of PriorityQueue uses an array to hold object. So "size" is infact a pointer to the next available spot in the array. By reducing it, the size of the array/queue is reduced, as if you are dropping the last element.

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Use an inverting Comparator and remove from the head. If you need both the head and the tail you are using the wrong data structure.

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You could probably use Guava's MinMaxPriorityQueue to do this. It provides peek, poll, and remove methods for both ends of the queue.

Another option is to write a Queue wrapper that enforces bounding, similar to this answer. You'd need to implement offer, add, and addAll to check capacity. Something like:

public class BoundedQueue<E> implements Serializable, Iterable<E>, Collection<E>, Queue<E> {
    private final Queue<E> queue;
    private int capacity;

    public BoundedQueue(Queue<E> queue, int capacity) {
        this.queue = queue;
        this.capacity = capacity;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean offer(E o) {
        if (queue.size() >= capacity)
            return false;
        return queue.add(o);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean add(E o) throws IllegalStateException {
        if (queue.size() >= capacity)
            throw new IllegalStateException("Queue full"); // same behavior as java.util.ArrayBlockingQueue
        return queue.add(o);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean addAll(Collection<? extends E> c) {
        boolean changed = false;
        for (E o: c)
            changed |= add(o);
        return changed;
    }

    // All other methods simply delegate to 'queue'
}
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