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I define arrays of integers in my code:

unsigned int tara[1024][3];
unsigned int data[1024][4];

I have storage structure, that allows me to pass them as void*:

 struct storage {
     unsigned int (*data)[4];
     unsigned int (*tara)[3];
 };

This is my use of structure above:

 int main() {
   unsigned int tara[1024][3];
   unsigned int data[1024][4];

   storage but_data;
   but_data.data = data;
   but_data.tara = tara;
   tara_button.setCallback(taraButtonCallback, (void*)&but_data);  //Some UI class
   while(true);   //The program
   return 0;
 }

In callback, this is how I try to access data:

bool taraButtonCallback(Opencv_Button* but, void* but_data)
{
    storage* data_struct = (storage*)but_data;
    int max = -5;
    int max_value = 0;
    cout<<data_struct->data[0][0]<<'\n';  //!!ERROR!!
    return true;
}

This is runtime error I get:

Unhandled exception at 0x00394f1c in OpenCV.exe: 0xC0000005: Access violation reading location 0x00000005.

Edit:

The problem is not related to to where is the but_data defined! This callback works:

bool taraButtonCallback(Opencv_Button* but, void* but_data)
{
    storage* data = (storage*)but_data;
    set_tara(data->data, data->tara, *data->mat);
    *(data->tara_set) = true;
    return true;
}
void set_tara(unsigned int data[][4], unsigned int tara[][3], Mat &UI_bot)
{
    UI_bot = Scalar(0, 0, 0);
    for(int x=0; x<cam_frame_width; x++) {
        tara[x][0]=data[x][0];
        tara[x][1]=data[x][1];
        tara[x][2]=data[x][2];
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
Are you sure the but_data object does not go out of scope by the time the taraButtonCallback gets executed? –  Andy Prowl Feb 27 '13 at 17:14
    
They are defined in main. –  Tomáš Zato Feb 27 '13 at 17:20
    
@AndyProwl: It is the lifetime of the object that is relevant (and that, as you suggest, likely ends before the callback is called), not the scope of the identifier. –  Eric Postpischil Feb 27 '13 at 17:34
    
The lifetime of the but_data is not relevant! In other callbacks, everything is fine! –  Tomáš Zato Feb 27 '13 at 17:52
4  
sscce.org -- please post a simplified, yet self contained and complete, example that demonstrates your problem. You don't know what you can safely eliminate, because if you did, you could solve the problem yourself. So take your code, and remove parts until it is really simple, yet still demonstrates your problem. The above code snippets are completely inadequate. –  Yakk Feb 27 '13 at 18:18

3 Answers 3

up vote -1 down vote accepted

You could try allocating the variable storage but_data like this:

storage *but_data = new storage;

effectively creating a variable with infinite lifetime. Than you would define your callback function a bit differently (because you already have a pointer, so you do not need the address of the variable) - like this:

tara_button.setCallback(taraButtonCallback, (void*)but_data);
//note the lack of '&' sign before the but_data variable name

Just don't forget to delete it after you no longer need it!

delete but_data;
share|improve this answer
    
I disagree with this answer. If the code shown above is what you really have, there is no reason to use "new" and "delete", since the lifetime of the "but_data" variable you already have is longer than the function call. I compiled your code, it ran fine, and I can see no obvious errors. There must me some missing info. –  pauld Feb 27 '13 at 19:05
    
If you made this change and it works, its probably because you are masking your real problem. You are probably reading from uninitialized heap memory that will not give you the access violation, instead of reading from un-initialized stack memory that will. –  pauld Feb 27 '13 at 19:08

At the time the callback is called, but_data is already destroyed:

storage but_data;

It is allocated locally, which means that its lifetime is limited with the end of current function. After the function is completed, it ceases to exist, and the callback uses a dangling pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
Nope, the but_data is defined correctly. It exist as long as the program, since its defined in the main() loop –  Tomáš Zato Feb 27 '13 at 17:45

Just assign it to a variable and print it

 int taraButtonCallback(void* but_data)
 {
      struct storage* data = ( struct storage*)but_data;
      int max = -5;
      int max_value = 0;
      int val = data->data[0][0];
      cout <<val ;  //!!works!!
      return 0;
   }

I think cout is unable to handle [][] in this case .. I am not sure why someone can enlighten both of us

share|improve this answer
    
If there is a problem with [][], it applies to the compiler. I first had problem with reading the value within IF statement, before I started debuging. –  Tomáš Zato Feb 27 '13 at 18:33
    
int val = data->data[0][0]; - throws same exception. –  Tomáš Zato Feb 27 '13 at 18:35
    
i am not sure about what is happening but i compiled a similar version at codepad.org/MGEC3Ikn –  Pradheep Feb 27 '13 at 18:37

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