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There's an extremely nasty-looking event-binding wrapper I've inherited whose rationale eludes me. All I know is the IE implementation of the plugin that uses it breaks if I try to replace it with a simple attachEvent or alias through to jQuery The author of this code has had it in place for so long he's forgotten the how what and why of it.

function AddEvent(obj, type, fn) {
    if (obj.attachEvent) {
        obj['e' + type + fn] = fn;
        obj[type + fn] = function() {
            obj['e' + type + fn](window.event);
        };
        obj.attachEvent('on' + type, obj[type + fn]);
    }
    else {
        obj.addEventListener(type, fn, false);
    }
};

I'm familiar with the very basic method of attaching functions directly to an HTML attribute or DOM property named for the event hook, but this looks far nastier. Here's my interpretation of what's going on:

Create a string, prefixed e, consisting of the event hook label and the string-coerced function (!?); Create a property of that name on the element in question, and assign the function to it.

obj['e' + type + fn] = fn;

The same string without the prefix will be another property of the element, which calls a function which in turn executes the original passed function (using the alias we just defined, for some reason), with window.event as an argument.

obj[type + fn] = function() {
    obj['e' + type + fn](window.event);
};

Finally, use the attachEvent method to bind the previous function to the event hook.

obj.attachEvent('on' + type, obj[type + fn]);
share|improve this question
    
What is your simple attachEvent? The 'e'+type+fn thing is a little odd, but it doesn't do anything extravagant. Also, what version of IE should this work in? – Halcyon Feb 27 '13 at 17:53
    
I would have stuck to the last line of the attachEvent code, with fn as the second argument. You say this code doesn't do anything extravagant — which is as may be — but I'd like to understand it. Do you know what it's doing, or why? As for versions, the plugin it was used in provides no functionality for IE6, but there's an assumption the code was part of an old snippet toolkit that was used as a generic event binding shim. – Barney Feb 27 '13 at 17:58

You can probably replace it by:

function AddEvent(obj, type, fn) {
    if (obj.attachEvent) {
        obj.attachEvent('on' + type, function (event) {
            return fn(event || window.event);
        });
    }
    else {
        obj.addEventListener(type, fn, false);
    }
};

Unless there is some dependency on the pollution of obj with two very strange property names.

share|improve this answer
    
Now that looks a million times cleaner. event || window.event is pretty self-evident too. I'll give this a whirl, see if the plugin still works… – Barney Feb 28 '13 at 9:18

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