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I wanted to modify the commit message on a commit I just made, so I tried to do:

git commit --amend

(as I normally do), but I got an error:

Unable to find modified files; please check git status

Now this is strange, because I'm not trying to add/remove files from the commit, I just want to change the message, so it shouldn't matter whether I have modified files or not.

Can anyone explain this error message (and ideally, how I can get past it)?

* EDIT *

Mellowcandle requested my git status; here it is (more or less):

# On branch some_branch
# Your branch is ahead of 'origin/some_branch' by 1 commit.
#
# Changes not staged for commit:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#   modified:   static/js/someFile.js
#
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
#   some/other/file
#   yet/another/file

* EDIT #2 *

The same problem occurs when I try to git rebase -i (with reword).

* EDIT #3 *

Here's the output of a git config --list (slightly anonymized), as requested by GoZoner:

user.name=My Name
user.email=email@example.com
push.default=upstream
core.repositoryformatversion=0
core.filemode=true
core.bare=false
core.logallrefupdates=true
remote.origin.fetch=+refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/*
remote.origin.url=git@github.com:someGitHubAccount/Apps.git
branch.master.remote=origin
branch.master.merge=refs/heads/master
branch.deploy.remote=origin
branch.deploy.merge=refs/heads/deploy
...*more branches that look similar*
share|improve this question
2  
Please post git status –  stdcall Feb 27 '13 at 18:02
1  
What is the last commit? (Use git log HEAD^.. to see it). Was it a merge commit? Maybe you're trying to amend the commit before that? –  Jonathan Wakely Feb 27 '13 at 18:13
    
You have modified files, thus git commit --amend won't change the last commit. This can be done only if the state is clean. The error message is confusing, I believe that was cleaned up recently. What version of git is that? –  vonbrand Feb 27 '13 at 18:15
    
@vonbrand, are you sure? I can amend the last commit with a dirty working tree no problem –  Jonathan Wakely Feb 27 '13 at 18:19
    
Okay, I have searched through the Git source now for all combinations of that error message and have found nothing. Are you sure you are using a real Git and not some wrapper that works in front of it? Also, which version of Git are you using? –  poke Feb 27 '13 at 18:31

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

Check if you don't have a custom hook which triggers on commit.

share|improve this answer

Alternatively, you could just do an interactive rebase on the parent of the current commit

git rebase -i head~

And then choose the reword option to change the commit message.

share|improve this answer
    
I am familiar with git rebase -i, but I really thought git commit --amend should work under these circumstances, so before I abandon the command entirely I'd (ideally) like to understand what's going on. –  machineghost Feb 27 '13 at 19:17
    
This is a bit belated, but I had the same issue happen to me again so I tried your approach. First off head~ should be HEAD~, right? Second, even when I did that, the rebase editor popped up as expected, but when I saved the file with reword I got the same command line output: Unable to find modified files; please check git status Successfully rebased and updated refs/heads/master. –  machineghost Apr 23 '13 at 21:02
    
In my case, (OS X) head is case insensitive. –  Abizern Apr 23 '13 at 21:23

git commit --amend will work just like git commit just that it will recycle your old commit. So what this means is that it will expect that there are actually some changes in the index, ready to be committed.

So, if you want your someFile.js to be included, run git add static/js/someFile.js first. If you also want to track that untracked file, add that too using git add some/other/file.

share|improve this answer
1  
You can amend a commit without any change in the tree. –  Michaël Witrant Feb 27 '13 at 18:12
    
@MichaëlWitrant Uhm, yeah, you’re right. –  poke Feb 27 '13 at 18:20

Try git commit --amend --only, and if that doesn't work then just try git stash; git commit --amend ; git stash pop. I'm not sure what state you're in here.

share|improve this answer
    
Neither --only or stashing before amending did any good; I got the same error message in both cases –  machineghost Feb 27 '13 at 19:16

Do git stash. Then do git commit --amend. After that do git stash pop.

share|improve this answer
1  
git, get, or got? –  CharlesB Feb 27 '13 at 18:38
1  
"got" is the past tense of "git" and "get" is the future tense, obviously. :-) –  torek Feb 27 '13 at 20:04
2  
!:#*#& phone auto correction –  stdcall Feb 27 '13 at 22:01

Works for me, both with and without modified, untracked files.

$ echo 'a' > a; git add -A; git commit -m 'a'
$ echo 'b' > b; git add -A; git commit -m 'b'

$ git log --oneline
63f2dd1 b
a0b364a a
$ git commit --amend
$ git log --oneline
d4cdeb7 bxx            # changed the commit message
a0b364a a

$ ed a # edit 'a'
$ git status
# On branch master
# Changes not staged for commit:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#   modified:   a
#
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

$ git commit --amend
$ git log --oneline
2d20e6e bxxyy           # changed the commit message again
a0b364a a

$ mkdir foo; echo 'c' > foo/c
$ git status
# On branch master
# Changes not staged for commit:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#   modified:   a
#
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
#   foo/
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

$ git commit --amend
ebg@ebg(31)$ git log --oneline
09c1b26 bxxyyzz
a0b364a a
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, and it used to work for me too, on a different machine. The point of the question though was to try and determine why it's not working on this machine. –  machineghost Apr 23 '13 at 22:34
    
I understand. Have you done a git config --list and looked for anything strange? –  GoZoner Apr 23 '13 at 23:07
    
I've added it to the answer; nothing looks strange to me (though I won't claim to be a Git config expert ...) –  machineghost Apr 24 '13 at 0:22
    
You have the same problem on a brand new git repository on the same machine? Do you have access to another machine to try there? Can you install another git version? –  GoZoner Apr 24 '13 at 1:47

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