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I have built a windows Service to monitor a few settings on our servers, I have developed quite a few WinForm and WPF apps but I am an absolute newbie when it comes to Windows Services, which is why I resorted to msdn and followed the tutorial on how to create a simple service. Now I can install the service just fine and make it run, but only if I cut some bits and pieces out of the microsoft tutorial.. but I am curious why, when I follow the tutorial, my service gets an unexpected error at startup.

After some testing it seems that the service seems to crash in the onstart method at SetServiceStatus()

public partial class MyService: ServiceBase
{
    private static ManualResetEvent pause = new ManualResetEvent(false);

    [DllImport("ADVAPI32.DLL", EntryPoint = "SetServiceStatus")]
    public static extern bool SetServiceStatus(IntPtr hServiceStatus, SERVICE_STATUS lpServiceStatus);
    private SERVICE_STATUS myServiceStatus;

    private Thread workerThread = null;
    public MyService()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        CanPauseAndContinue = true;
        CanHandleSessionChangeEvent = true;
        ServiceName = "MyService";
    }
    static void Main()
    {
        // Load the service into memory.
        System.ServiceProcess.ServiceBase.Run(MyService());
    }

    protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
    {
        IntPtr handle = this.ServiceHandle;
        myServiceStatus.currentState = (int)State.SERVICE_START_PENDING;
        **SetServiceStatus(handle, myServiceStatus);**
        // Start a separate thread that does the actual work.
        if ((workerThread == null) || ((workerThread.ThreadState & (System.Threading.ThreadState.Unstarted | System.Threading.ThreadState.Stopped)) != 0))
        {
            workerThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(ServiceWorkerMethod));
            workerThread.Start();
        }
        myServiceStatus.currentState = (int)State.SERVICE_RUNNING;
        SetServiceStatus(handle, myServiceStatus);
    }
 }

Now my service seems to run just fine when I comment out the SetServiceStatus() lines. Why does this fail? Is this a rights-issue or am I completely missing the point here?

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2  
Do you have some specific reason for calling SetServiceStatus? It's not strictly required and you can probably just get rid of those calls. –  CodingGorilla Feb 27 '13 at 17:55
1  
you can follow this easy tutorial here to make a simple windows service. All those external calls are not needed for your service to work. [codeproject.com/Articles/14353/… –  Faaiz Khan Feb 27 '13 at 19:12
    
Well I had no specific reason, was just trying to follow msdn and was wondering why on earth it was failing. –  XikiryoX Feb 27 '13 at 22:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In general, you shouldn't have to call SetServiceStatus when implementing a managed service using the framework.

That being said, if you do call it, you need to fully initialize the SERVICE_STATUS before using it. You're currently only setting the state, but none of the other variables.

This is suggested in the best practices for SetServiceStatus: "Initialize all fields in the SERVICE_STATUS structure, ensuring that there are valid check-point and wait hint values for pending states. Use reasonable wait hints."

share|improve this answer
1  
Indeed, what he said. Implementing (and responding to) the events, such as OnStart(), OnStop(), and the other various power events will implicitly manage the status of your service, based on your handling of those events. You shouldn't need any externs / direct access to Win32 APIs to do what you've illustrated here. –  Ken Mason Feb 27 '13 at 18:01
    
so in general, I would not need to use the SetServiceStatus when creating a managed service like this. And if I do... there are some more things I need to worry about. Thanks, you guys shed some light in the dark here. cheers. –  XikiryoX Feb 27 '13 at 22:09

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