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The Base Class:

public class DatabaseBase
{
  private readonly string connectionString;
  private bool useCounters;

  public DatabaseBase(string connectionString)
  {
   this.connectionString = connectionString;
  }

  public DatabaseBase(...)
  {
   connectionString = ...;   
  }

  public DatabaseBase(..)
  {
   connectionString = string.Format(...);
  }

  public string ConnectionString
  {
   get { return this.connectionString; }
  }

...

The derived class:

public class ProjectDB : DatabaseBase
{
private bool useServiceConnection;

 private static string ConnectionString
 {
     get
     {
        string connectionString = useServiceConnection == true ? ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["SomeConnection1"] : ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["SomeConnection2"];
         return connectionString;
     }
 }


public ProjectDB() : this(false)
{
}

 private bool isServiceCall;

public ProjectDB(bool useServiceConnection)
    : base(ConnectionString)
{
    this.useServiceConnection = useServiceConnection;
}

private SqlConnection CreateConnection()
{
    return new SqlConnection(ConnectionString);
}

I'm getting the error "Cannot access non-static field useServiceConnection in static context" for this line:

string connectionString = useServiceConnection == true ? ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["SomeConnection1"] : ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["SomeConnection2"];

However if I make useServiceConnection a static var to satisfy the quirement, then I get that same error here in the constructor:

public ProjectDB(bool useServiceConnection)
    : base(ConnectionString)
{
    this.useServiceConnection = useServiceConnection;
}

Now if I make useServiceConnection and ConnectionSting property non-static, then I get that error for the constructor here:

public LitleDB(bool useWebServiceConnection)
    : base(ConnectionString)
{
    this.useWebServiceConnection = useWebServiceConnection;
}

I think the first 2 I understand.

But now with the example updated below, why would the constructor in this case give me an error still? Those are no longer static so where's the static context being expected from? So here's what I have now:

public class ProjectDB : DatabaseBase
 {
    private bool useServiceConnection; <-- NO LONGER STATIC

     private new string ConnectionString <-- NO LONGER STATIC
     {
         get
         {
            string connectionString = useServiceConnection == true ? ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["SomeConnection1"] : ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["SomeConnection2"];
             return connectionString;
         }
     }

    public ProjectDB() : this(false)
    {
    }

     private bool isServiceCall;

    public ProjectDB(bool useServiceConnection)
        : base(ConnectionString)  <--- IT'S COMPLAINING HERE NOW, SO WHERE IS IT TRYING TO ACCESS STATICALLY?  I DON'T GET WHY
    {
        this.useServiceConnection = useServiceConnection;
    }

I have other static properties in this class, does that have anything to do with it? I'm not using them though.

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I updated this post. I understand the first two now after looking at it again. But the last issue is what bugs me. If I change ConnectionString property and useServiceConnection to instance members, why the static error when I try to pass ConnectionString into the constructor of the Base? –  CoffeeAddict Oct 2 '09 at 21:43
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4 Answers

The variable useServiceConnection is not static so it only exists within the context of an instance of the class. Since the property ConnectionString is static, it does not exist in the context of an instance, and so it cannot "see" instance members. You will need to either make ConnectionString not being static, or make useServiceConnection static.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand that...but check out my last update to the original post about the constructor issue. –  CoffeeAddict Oct 2 '09 at 21:42
    
@coffeeaddict: noticed that. I would suggest you take the advice given in the last paragraph of the answer by @womp: make ConnectionString into an instance property instead of a static one. –  Fredrik Mörk Oct 2 '09 at 21:44
    
You haven't really given us all the code for your constructors, or any of the code for LittleDB, so it's kind of hard to tell. –  womp Oct 2 '09 at 21:47
    
that was a misstype. It should be ProjectDB...updated it, check again. –  CoffeeAddict Oct 2 '09 at 21:49
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A static member belongs to a type rather than a specific instance of a type. It doesn't matter whether you have no instances of a class or you create a million instances when it comes to static members. Only one will exist. This is not the case for instance variables. Basically, each instance you create has its own specific instance variables. This is why you can't access instance members in static contexts without an object instance. It's not clear the instance member you want to access belongs to which object. You can, however, reference instance members in static contexts by specifying an object reference explicitly:

obj.instanceMember // valid in static context as `obj` specifies the object
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Static members are a property of the class itself. You don't even have to have any instances of Database created anywhere to access Database.ConnectionString when ConnectionString is a static property.

So, inside your property declaration, when you try to access "useServiceConnection", it doesn't know what you're talking about. useServiceConnection is an instance variable - it only exists for a given instance of the Database class. What if there were no database classes instantiated? What if there were 5? It doesn't make sense to access instance members of a class from a static scope.

I would make your ConnectionString property non-static, as it doesn't really seem like something that should be static anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand what static properties and members are. I just don't get why the 2nd constructor is complaining when I don't have any static anywhere. Why is it saying it cannot access non-static when the ConnectionString is no longer static to begin with after I took static off? –  CoffeeAddict Oct 2 '09 at 22:02
    
Look at my last update to the thread. I don't have either of them static anymore. See why I am stuck...it's now complaining at the constructor level but why, when I don't have any static fields or properties set? They're all instance now. –  CoffeeAddict Oct 2 '09 at 22:03
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Make the ConnectionString and useWebServiceConnection in the LitleDb class instance members also.

However, I don't think that your constructors will work properly once they compile. You are calling the base constructor with the value from ConnectionString as parameter, but at that time you haven't set the useServiceConnection variable, so it will always be false and the ConnectionString property will always return the second connection string.

share|improve this answer
    
correction, Litle should be Project so ProjectDB was a mistype –  CoffeeAddict Oct 2 '09 at 21:55
    
On your second statement..I see. So how would I set it and be able to also send it then to the base constructor? –  CoffeeAddict Oct 2 '09 at 21:57
    
Maybe I could do the setting in the initial empty constructor. Which constructor gets called first? –  CoffeeAddict Oct 2 '09 at 21:59
1  
You can't use the ConnectionString property there, as the current instance is not created until after the base constructor has been called. Setting anyting in the parameterless constructor doesn't help as it's not called. Only one constructor in the class is called, unless you use :this() to chain them. –  Guffa Oct 2 '09 at 22:33
    
How would I chain them, can you explain further? –  CoffeeAddict Oct 5 '09 at 2:27
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