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I have little dummy software to test the precision of the stopwatch in visual basic. I've been told that visual basic has a real good timing, but I'm experiencing some strange behaviors.

This is ALL my code:

Imports System.IO
Public Class Form1
    Public tmrTime As New Stopwatch
    Dim currentDate As Date

    Private Sub Form1_Load(sender As System.Object, e As System.EventArgs) Handles MyBase.Load
        tmrTime.Start()

    End Sub

    Private Sub Form1_KeyUp(sender As Object, e As System.Windows.Forms.KeyEventArgs) Handles Me.KeyUp
        TextBox1.Text = (tmrTime.ElapsedTicks / Stopwatch.Frequency) * 1000

    End Sub


    Private Sub Form1_KeyDown(sender As Object, e As System.Windows.Forms.KeyEventArgs) Handles Me.KeyDown

        TextBox2.Text = (tmrTime.ElapsedTicks / Stopwatch.Frequency) * 1000
    End Sub
End Class

The problem si that if I take the non-decimal part of the two textbox (which is the absolute time of pressing and the abs. time of releasing) they are almost ALWAYS coupled, that is BOTH ODD or BOTH EVEN.

Do you know what's happening?

I have the same result using tmrTime.ElapsedMilliseconds or tmrTime.Elapsed.Ticks :-\

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2  
Sure. The basic flaw in your code is that you don't measure when the key was pressed/released, you measure when the event handler started running. Which is governed by the scheduling algorithm in Windows, code that runs on a very regular heart beat. –  Hans Passant Feb 27 '13 at 18:34
    
Thank you, but there is any way to measure when the key was pressed/released then? –  Vaaal88 Feb 27 '13 at 20:43
    
You'd have to pinvoke GetLastInputInfo(). But that's pretty pointless, the accuracy of the timestamp on a message is only 16 msec, no better than what you have now. There are very few scenarios where that's a real problem. –  Hans Passant Feb 27 '13 at 20:57
    
I am measuring reaction time, in which small differences of milliseconds are important. Using a different thread as a timer may work in your opinion? –  Vaaal88 Feb 27 '13 at 21:04

1 Answer 1

There is a good article about StopWatch/Timer precision in .Net here on a MSDN blog. If I correctly understand what you want to do, this should solve your problem:

Public Class Form1
    Private _sw As New Stopwatch

    Private Sub Form1_KeyDown(sender As Object, e As KeyEventArgs) Handles MyBase.KeyDown
        _sw.Start()
    End Sub

    Private Sub Form1_KeyUp(sender As Object, e As KeyEventArgs) Handles MyBase.KeyUp
        Dim elapsed As Long
        elapsed = _sw.ElapsedTicks
        _sw.Stop()
        tbTicks.Text = (elapsed / Stopwatch.Frequency) * 1000
        _sw.Reset()
    End Sub
End Class
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