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I want to print out a message in the page's <div> element upon page load. I have the following HTML and JavaScript code:

<body onload="printMsg()">
    <div id="write"></div>
</body>

function printMsg() {
    var node = document.getElementById("write");
    node.innerHTML = "<p>" + "Hello World!" + "</p>";
}

Here I used onload event in <body> element to call printMsg() upon page load.

But if I don't use onload event, is there any alternative way to write to <div id="write"></div> directly within the JavaScript function printMsg()?

share|improve this question
2  
You can't write to a DOM element until it's loaded so you'd need some kind of callback equivalent to onload. If you want to avoid it you should be able to just make sure the script tag comes after the DOM element, I'd suggest right before the end of the body. You are writing to the div in the function...you can't invoke a function within it's declaration but you can do so immediately afterward function() {..}();. So try moving printMsg down and adding the (); after the closing brace. – Matt Whipple Feb 27 '13 at 18:51
    
Thanks Matt. It seems that I cannot put <div onload="printMsg()"></div> to invoke the function printMsg(). So besides the approaches pointed by others, is there any way to invoke the printMsg() function by adding a callback to <div> element? – tonga Feb 27 '13 at 19:18
up vote 7 down vote accepted

as Whipple suggested you can do it as following :

   <body>
    <div id="write"></div>
    <script>
    (function printMsg() {
        var node = document.getElementById("write");
        node.innerHTML = "<p>" + "Hello World!" + "</p>";
    })();
    </script>
    </body>        

DEMO

share|improve this answer
1  
I think you want to remove the onload. – Mathletics Feb 27 '13 at 18:56
    
yes you are right dude. – Behnam Esmaili Feb 27 '13 at 19:00
    
@BehnamEsmaili: Thanks a lot. So what is the magic here? Why can we use (function printMsg() {} )() to get rid of onload event? – tonga Feb 27 '13 at 19:12
1  
@tonga there is no magic here.i just declared a self-calling function.this type of function in javascript called closure.check this link for more info about closure : stackoverflow.com/questions/6090912/… – Behnam Esmaili Feb 27 '13 at 19:16
3  
@tonga it is an immediately invoked function express, which creates a closure. (All squares are rectangles; not all rectangles are squares, etc.) – Mathletics Feb 27 '13 at 19:23

You can put these function inside the declaration: $(document).ready(function() { });

You can call these in you header inside 'script', or put it in another file and call it back. All the functions inside this declaration will run with the loading of the page. The effect is the same that you onload, but don't mess with your body tag.

share|improve this answer
    
Question doesn't mention jQuery so this isn't going to be a valid answer. – Rondel Feb 27 '13 at 18:56
    
My mistake... I'm just too used to Jquery.. – madaaah Feb 27 '13 at 19:35

You can write a simple javascript function to create an element instead of manually writing each tag, which can get confusing if you do it a lot.

Also, as Matt Whipple pointed out:

make sure the script tag comes after the DOM element

HTML:

<body>
    <div id="write"></div>
    <script>printMsg()</script>
</body>

Javascript:

function printMsg() {
    newElement = document.createElement('p');
    newElement.innerHTML = "Hello world!";
    document.getElementById("write").appendChild(newElement);
}

http://jsfiddle.net/Qrsmq/7/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This works great too. – tonga Feb 27 '13 at 19:26

You can use:

window.onload  =   function() {
    var node = document.getElementById("write");
    node.innerHTML = "<p>" + "Hello World!" + "</p>";
}

or

function printMsg() {
    newElement = document.createElement('p');
    newElement.innerHTML = "Hello world!";
    document.getElementById("write").appendChild(newElement);
}
document.body.onload = printMsg;

or

function printMsg() {
    newElement = document.createElement('p');
    newElement.innerHTML = "Hello world!";
    document.getElementById("write").appendChild(newElement);
}
window.onload  = printMsg;
share|improve this answer

There is also .ready function, but requires using jQuery. If you are already thinking of using jquery for other things this is the way to go. It runs once the DOM is ready.

But the most straight forward option would be to call the function inline, at the end of the body:

<body>
    <div id="write"></div>
    <script>
        (function(){ 
             //do something with #write
        });
    </script>
</body>

Like the ready function it also only waits for the DOM to be loaded, it ia faster than the onload listener and it should be as back compatible with browsers ad javascript is =)

share|improve this answer
var myWeb = new Object(), _m = "model", _v = "view", _c = "controller";

myWeb.model = {

    myEle   : "log",
    myText  : "Hello World!"

}
myWeb.view = {

    doText : function() {
        document.getElementById(myWeb[_m].myEle).innerHTML = myWeb[_m].myText;
    }

}
myWeb.controller = {

    init: function() {
        if (document.readyState == "complete") {
            this.run();
        } else {
            setTimeout(myWeb[_c].init, 11);
        }
    },
    run: function() {
        myWeb[_v].doText();
    }

}
myWeb[_c].init();
share|improve this answer

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