Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have

sort(arr, arr+n, pred);

How do I sort in reverse order?

share|improve this question
    
Is pred a predicate you wrote? –  AraK Oct 2 '09 at 22:06

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There also seems to be a possibility to use reverse iterators ... except using the reversed predicate might be easier, except perhaps when the type doesn't implement operator> :)

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

int main()
{
    int arr[4] = { 3, 2, 5, 4 };
    std::sort(std::reverse_iterator<int*>(arr + 4), std::reverse_iterator<int*>(arr));
}
share|improve this answer
    
this is what I was looking for, thanks –  Neil G Oct 3 '09 at 19:04

You could use greater from the standard library which calls operator> automatically for the type you want to sort.

#include <funcitonal>
.....
sort(arr, arr+n, greater<Type>()); // Type could be double for example
share|improve this answer

If you're given pred (i.e. you can't get inside it to reverse the order), something like:

std::sort(arr, arr+n, boost:bind<bool>(pred, _2, _1));
share|improve this answer

Negate the return value of pred.

share|improve this answer
3  
I think you need more than this. Pred needs to be a strict weak ordering, e.g., like < not <=. If you negate a strict weak ordering you don't get another strict weak ordering: negating < turns into >= not >. –  David Norman Oct 2 '09 at 22:18
1  
David's right, you need to reverse the operands, not negate the return value. –  Steve Jessop Oct 2 '09 at 22:30
1  
@David: Fair point. –  Troubadour Oct 2 '09 at 22:32

As alrady said, you should provde a reversed predicate. If you can't for some reasons (like pure laziness), you can always first sort then reverse :

sort(arr, arr+n, pred);
reverse( arr, arr+n );

That would be more work for the computer but it's clear and does the job. If you need speed performance for this sort, use the reversed predicate solution.

share|improve this answer

Quite Easy i seems

std::sort(myVec.rbegin(),myVec.rend());


int main() 
{
    typedef std::vector<int> vecType;
    vecType myVec;
    for(int a=0;a<20;a++)
    {
    	myVec.push_back((rand()%100));
    }
    std::copy(myVec.begin(), myVec.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, "\n"));
    cout<<"\n---------------------------------------------------\n";
    std::sort(myVec.rbegin(),myVec.rend());
    std::copy(myVec.begin(), myVec.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, "\n"));
    return 0;	
}
share|improve this answer
sort(arr, arr+n, std::not1(pred));

See: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/std/functional/not1/

share|improve this answer
1  
Wrong: pred(a,a) will return false, as it should, but not1(pred(a,a)) incorrectly returns true. This may cause sort() to hang. –  MSalters Oct 5 '09 at 10:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.