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My perl script produces a vairiable that has the following Data::Dumper output.

$VAR1 = [
  {
    'displayName' => 'unconfirmed',
    'tagName' => 'unconfirmed'
  },
  {
    'displayName' => 'new',
    'tagName' => 'new'
  },
  {
    'displayName' => 'started',
    'tagName' => 'started'
  },
  {
    'displayName' => 'reopened',
    'tagName' => 'reopened'
  },
  {
    'displayName' => 'resolved',
    'tagName' => 'resolved'
  }
];

The perl code to recreate this output looks like this:

my $foo = ([
  {
    'displayName' => 'unconfirmed',
    'tagName' => 'unconfirmed'
  },
  {
    'displayName' => 'new',
    'tagName' => 'new'
  },
  {
    'displayName' => 'started',
    'tagName' => 'started'
  },
  {
    'displayName' => 'reopened',
    'tagName' => 'reopened'
  },
  {
    'displayName' => 'resolved',
    'tagName' => 'resolved'
  }
]);
print Dumper($foo);

Question A: How can I access the content?

thanx for the help! Here's an example on how to access the structure.

for my $item (@{$foo}) {
    print $item->{tagName};
}

Question B: What is a good reference for the language context: hashes, arrays, meaning of different parenthesis, etc?

Note: The structure itself is at the end of several soap calls, xpath (SOM->valueof) and direct references ($som->{tag1}->{tag2}), yet I hope this question will be easier to ask and to answer.

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You have a hash reference, not a hash without keys. –  squiguy Feb 27 '13 at 18:54
    
wow, that was fast! Thank you all. updated the question with working code. –  Volker Feb 27 '13 at 19:01
    
    
I highly recommend perldoc perlreftut which is the references tutorial. This easy to read document gives just a couple simple rules that help you understand and use references, especially in deep data structures. –  Joel Berger Feb 27 '13 at 21:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Perl doesn't create keyless hashes. What you're looking at there with $foo is an array reference, so you'll have to do print $foo->[$_]{displayName} for 0 .. $#{$foo}.

And well, as for reference, you don't need that, you need a full-fledged intro text. Please refer to http://perl-tutorial.org

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Thanx for the info link. Good site. –  Volker Feb 27 '13 at 19:09

Answer A:

Since you have used references (which are scalars) to the hashes and arrays, you should de-reference the scalar in order to access the Elements.

For example if you are willing to access 3rd hash, you'll access this as:

$foo->[2]->{"displayName"}; # accesses 'started'
$foo->[2]->{"tagName"}; # accesses 'started'

Answer B:

For references please refer this.

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You comment broke the dam, thanx. –  Volker Feb 27 '13 at 19:09
    
"references (which are scalars)", not the confusing "scalar references". \$x is a scalar reference. –  ysth Feb 27 '13 at 20:09
    
@ysth Made the changes. Thank you. –  Krishnachandra Sharma Feb 28 '13 at 4:54

A good start for learning about complex Perl data structures like this is the Data Structures Cookbook which is included with every Perl installation (type perldoc perldsc on your command line).

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