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I will keep it short. When I run the code, I enter the first character (e.g: 'k') and everything is fine. Second time I enter a character (e.g: 'j') I get an error and the compiler says that it is on the line (that has a comment). Please help. Thank you.

Code:

struct nodeType{
    char letter;
    nodeType*leftNode;
    nodeType*rightNode;

};
void putInNode(nodeType*n,char c){
    if ((char)(n->letter) >='a' && (char)(n->letter) <='z')/* ERROR IS HERE*/
    {
        if(n->letter < c)
            putInNode(n->leftNode, c);
        else
            putInNode(n->rightNode, c);
    }
    n->letter=c;
}
int main(){
    nodeType*a=new nodeType();
    char c;
    do {
        cin >> c;
        if(c=='.')
            break;
        putInNode(a,c);
    } while (true);
    cout << a->letter << endl;

}
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closed as too localized by Beta, SztupY, Mario, Ben Trengrove, Neolisk Feb 28 '13 at 0:43

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
And what error do you get? Please include the complete and unedited error message. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 27 '13 at 18:56
    
By the way, you should really create a constructor that makes the pointers null, and also check for null, or you will step around in memory until your program crashes. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 27 '13 at 18:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If the purpose of this is to build a tree of only letters from the input stream, stopping when you reach a period, and skipping anything that is not in {'a'...'z'}, I think this is what you're after:

#include <iostream>

struct nodeType
{
    nodeType(char ch = 0)
       : letter(ch), leftNode(), rightNode()
    {}

    char letter;
    nodeType* leftNode;
    nodeType* rightNode;
};

void putInNode(nodeType*& n,char c)
{
    if (!n)
    {
        n = new nodeType(c);
    }
    else if (n->letter >='a' && n->letter <='z')
    {
        if(c < n->letter)
            putInNode(n->leftNode, c);
        else
            putInNode(n->rightNode, c);
    }
}

int main()
{
    nodeType* a = NULL;
    char c;
    while ((std::cin >> c) && c != '.')
        putInNode(a,c);

    if (a)
        std::cout << a->letter << '\n';
}

Note: this pushes duplicates down the right child line. If this is not the intention, change the following:

        if(c < n->letter))
            putInNode(n->leftNode, c);

to this instead:

        if(c <= n->letter)) // <== note less-or-equal
            putInNode(n->leftNode, c);

I leave the cleanup of the resulting dynamic tree to you. And it should be noted that as-written (both prior and now) the first node will always be the root of your tree (I assume someday you're planning on balancing via shifts and such as you move further down this road).

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Pretty sure that the problem is that you're not actually allocating any nodes appart from the root node. Therefore, when you enter the second letter, the first letter has already set the letter in the parent node, and when it tries to dereference the left node in the tree, it fails (b/c that's unallocated memory).

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Nail => Head –  StoryTeller Feb 27 '13 at 19:06

The problem is you are only allocating space for a single node and not initializing your variables.

First time through the do loop I assume a->letter = 0 so when entering the putInNode function the letter will be assigned to k. Next time through the loop n->letter will be k which is in between a and z and k < j will be true so putInNode(n->leftNode, c);

n->leftNode has not been initialized however so when you try to deference it like n->letter you will get a segfault.

To fix this (assuming you do not want this function to make new nodes) is to create a constructor for your struct then check for null.

struct nodeType{
  nodeType() 
  {
    letter    = 0;
    leftNode  = nullptr;
    rightNode = nullptr;
  }
  char letter;
  nodeType*leftNode;
  nodeType*rightNode;
};

Then in putInNode

void putInNode(nodeType*n,char c){
   if(n == nullptr) {
      return;
   }
   if ((char)(n->letter) >='a' && (char)(n->letter) <='z') {
   .
   .
   .
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you guys very very much. I am new to this field, that's why it might seem like a silly question. But I appreciate it a lot. Problem is solved. –  alhadhrami Feb 27 '13 at 19:32

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