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I am creating a simple User class, does it matter if I use public properties with private fields verses just using public fields?

Here is an example of what I mean:

public class clsUser
{
private string name;
private string lName;

    public string Name
    {
        get
        {
            return name;
        }
        set
        {
            name= value;
        }
    }

    public string LName
    {
        get
        {
            return lName;
        }
        set
        {
            lName= value;
        }
    }

public clsUser(string userID)
    {

//get the user id here and set the properties

        this.name= getName(userID);
        this.lName= getLName(userID);      
    }

}

or can I just make

public string name;
public string lName;

public and now worry about typing out all of these:

public string Name
{
    get
    {
        return name;
    }
    set
    {
        name= value;
    }
}

I am then going to populate a form using these on another page like so:

clsUser cUser - new clsUser("myid");
txtSomething.Text = cUser.name;

and so on...

I guess my question is why do I need to retype the properties first as private and then as public (as I've seen in all web examples). Why not just make them public to begin with?

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marked as duplicate by Servy, Robert Harvey Feb 27 '13 at 19:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
"why do i need to retype the properties first as private and then as public" You don't. I think you can just write public string Name { get; set; } –  user1477388 Feb 27 '13 at 19:30
    
Do you want people who use your class to modify the properties, if yes, then public, if not then private. –  JonH Feb 27 '13 at 19:30
2  
1  
Don't use Hungarian Notation. You class should be named User. –  SLaks Feb 27 '13 at 19:32
1  
@TanyaXrum The code you see creates a field called name and lets you access it through a property called Name. Since it's accessed by the property - the field can remain private. If you just use a field - Yes you can make it public and omit the property altogether. (As for whether you should use fields or properties - you can see the link that was posted to you question or others like it.) –  ispiro Feb 27 '13 at 19:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're confusing fields with properties.

String name; is a field.
Unlike a property, you have no control over it.
If you eventually decide to add validation or change events or other logic, you'll need to change it to a property, which will break compiled code.
Certain features (eg, bindings) also can only work with properties.

Instead, you can use auto-implemented properties to make the compiler generate all of that boilerplate:

public String Name { get; set; }
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