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This is further to my question here

By doing some reading .... I moved away from Semaphores to ThreadPool.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;

namespace ThreadPoolTest
{
    class Data
    {
        public int Pos { get; set; }
        public int Num { get; set; }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static ManualResetEvent[] resetEvents = new ManualResetEvent[20];

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {            

            int s = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
            {                
                resetEvents[s] = new ManualResetEvent(false);
                Data d = new Data();
                d.Pos = s;
                d.Num = i;
                ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(new WaitCallback(Process), (object)d);
                if (s >= 19)
                {
                    WaitHandle.WaitAll(resetEvents);
                    Console.WriteLine("Press Enter to Move forward");
                    Console.ReadLine();
                    s = 0;
                }
                else
                {
                    s = s + 1;
                }
            }
        }

        private static void Process(object o)
        {
            Data d = (Data) o;
            Console.WriteLine(d.Num.ToString());
            Thread.Sleep(10000);
            resetEvents[d.Pos].Set();
        }
    }
}

This code works and I am able to process in the sets of 20. But I don't like this code because of WaitAll. So let's say I start a batch of 20, and 3 threads take longer time while 17 have finished. Even then I will keep the 17 threads as waiting because of the WaitAll.

WaitAny would have been good... but it seems rather messy that I will have to build so much of control structures like Stacks, Lists, Queues etc in order to use the pool efficiently.

The other thing I don't like is that whole global variable in the class for resetEvents. because this array has to be shared between the Process method and the main loop.

The above code works... but I need your help in improving it.

Again... I am on .NET 2.0 VS 2008. I cannot use .NET 4.0 parallel/async framework.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are several ways you can do this. Probably the easiest, based on what you've posted above, would be:

const int MaxThreads = 4;
const int ItemsToProcess = 10000;
private Semaphore _sem = new Semaphore(MaxThreads, MaxThreads);

void DoTheWork()
{
    int s = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < ItemsToProcess; ++i)
    {
        _sem.WaitOne();
        Data d = new Data();
        d.Pos = s;
        d.Num = i;
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(Process, d);
        ++s;
        if (s >= 19)
            s = 0;
    }

    // All items have been assigned threads.
    // Now, acquire the semaphore "MaxThreads" times.
    // When counter reaches that number, we know all threads are done.
    int semCount = 0;
    while (semCount < MaxThreads)
    {
        _sem.WaitOne();
        ++semCount;
    }
    // All items are processed

    // Clear the semaphore for next time.
    _sem.Release(semCount);
}

void Process(object o)
{
    // do the processing ...

    // release the semaphore
    _sem.Release();
}

I only used four threads in my example because that's how many cores I have. It makes little sense to be using 20 threads when only four of them can be processing at any one time. But you're free to increase the MaxThreads number if you like.

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm sure I'm doing something wrong, but my code always paused indefinitely on line 26 (_sem.WaiteOne();). I added a counter to check how many times the while (semCount < MaxThreads) loop ran - and as soon as it had run as many times as MaxThreads it returns. e.g., outside the method declare an int like someInt, then add if (++someInt>= MaxThreads) return; at line 25. This seems to work, but feels like a hack and I'd like to understand why your solution doesn't work as-is for me... –  GojiraDeMonstah Oct 31 '13 at 14:16
    
@GojiraDeMonstah: Your modification is correct. My code had a bug. I've modified that loop in my example. Thanks for finding that for me. –  Jim Mischel Oct 31 '13 at 14:25

So I'm pretty sure this is all .NET 2.0.

We'll start out defining Action, because I'm so used to using it. If using this solution in 3.5+, remove that definition.

Next, we create a queue of actions based on the input.

After that we define a callback; this callback is the meat of the method.

It first grabs the next item in the queue (using a lock since the queue isn't thread safe). If it ended up having an item to grab it executes that item. Next it adds a new item to the thread pool which is "itself". This is a recursive anonymous method (you don't come across uses of that all that often). This means that when the callback is called for the first time it will execute one item, then schedule a task which will execute another item, and that item will schedule a task that executes another item, and so on. Eventually the queue will run out, and they'll stop queuing more items.

We also want the method to block until we're all done, so for that we keep track of how many of these callbacks have finished through incrementing a counter. When that counter reaches the task limit we signal the event.

Finally we start N of these callbacks in the thread pool.

public delegate void Action();
public static void Execute(IEnumerable<Action> actions, int maxConcurrentItems)
{
    object key = new object();
    Queue<Action> queue = new Queue<Action>(actions);
    int count = 0;
    AutoResetEvent whenDone = new AutoResetEvent(false);

    WaitCallback callback = null;
    callback = delegate
    {
        Action action = null;
        lock (key)
        {
            if (queue.Count > 0)
                action = queue.Dequeue();
        }
        if (action != null)
        {
            action();
            ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(callback);
        }
        else
        {
            if (Interlocked.Increment(ref count) == maxConcurrentItems)
                whenDone.Set();
        }

    };

    for (int i = 0; i < maxConcurrentItems; i++)
    {
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(callback);
    }

    whenDone.WaitOne();
}

Here's another option that doesn't use the thread pool, and just uses a fixed number of threads:

public static void Execute(IEnumerable<Action> actions, int maxConcurrentItems)
{
    Thread[] threads = new Thread[maxConcurrentItems];
    object key = new object();
    Queue<Action> queue = new Queue<Action>(actions);
    for (int i = 0; i < maxConcurrentItems; i++)
    {
        threads[i] = new Thread(new ThreadStart(delegate
        {
            Action action = null;
            do
            {
                lock (key)
                {
                    if (queue.Count > 0)
                        action = queue.Dequeue();
                    else 
                        action = null;
                }
                if (action != null)
                {
                    action();
                }
            } while (action != null);
        }));
        threads[i].Start();
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < maxConcurrentItems; i++)
    {
        threads[i].Join();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting ideas, but a few bugs. The first example won't process more than MaxConcurrentItems items, because the thread callback doesn't loop. In the second item, the threads will go forever because action is never set to null in the loop. –  Jim Mischel Feb 28 '13 at 12:19
    
@JimMischel The first option isn't supposed to loop. It's recursive, kinda. It call itself, from within itself, and that second call will call another, and another and so on until the queue is empty, which is how it processes all of the items. The second one did have a small bug though, that's correct, I've now fixed that. –  Servy Feb 28 '13 at 14:54
    
ahhh ... now I see it. I didn't see that embedded call to QueueUserWorkItem. Thanks. –  Jim Mischel Feb 28 '13 at 15:33
    
The primary difference between my solution and both of yours is that yours is completely asynchronous. The main thread would have to check that the job is done at some point, but it's free to do other work while the workers process items. In my solution the main thread is intimately involved in scheduling the item processing. Interesting, the two different approaches to the problem. Oh, and Action is indeed available in .NET 2.0. –  Jim Mischel Feb 28 '13 at 15:40
    
@JimMischel Both of these tasks are inhierently asynchronous, but I tacked on synchronous waits to both, so they are both blocking methods. Making them asynchronous though would be as simple as removing those blocking waits and possibly adding some sort of callback to allow the caller to know when it's done. –  Servy Feb 28 '13 at 15:47

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