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I don't understand the syntax required for dynamically allocating members of a struct in c++. Basically, I need to fill char array members to exact size using a temp array and strlen. Here is my struct:

struct card
   {
   char *rank;
   char *suit;
   char color;
   bool dealt;
   char *location;
   };

Here is the function that uses the struct:

bool importCard(card *deckPtr, char *deckName);

I created an array of 52 cards and assigned a pointer to it, and passed it to the function as the first parameter. (deckPtr) Here is a loop in the function that is supposed to read in card info to the struct data members.

for(index=0;index<52;index++,deckPtr++)
  {

  fin >> *temp;
  charCount=stringLength(temp);
  deckPtr.*rank = new char[charCount+1];
  stringCopy(*temp, deckPtr.*rank);

  fin >> *temp;
  charCount=stringLength(temp);
  deckPtr.*suit = new char[charCount+1];
  stringCopy(*temp, deckPtr.*suit);

  if(deckPtr.*suit==('d')||deckPtr.*suit==('h'))
     {
     (*deckPtr).color='r';
     }
  else
     {
     (*deckPtr).color='b';
     }

  (*deckPtr).dealt=false;

  deckPtr.*location = new char[11];
  stringCopy(unshPtr, deckPtr.*location);

  }

I am getting three compile errors: "rank" "suit" and "location" are "not declared in this scope." What am I doing wrong? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
stringLength and stringCopy are my own functions. I had to write them (this program is a class assignment) but they function the same way as their string library counterparts. –  Bobazonski Feb 27 '13 at 19:39
    
Are rank and suit ever more than one character? Also your operator choice is not terribly idiomatic for C++, which is probably part of the problem. –  user7116 Feb 27 '13 at 19:40
1  
Don't bother with the char*, just use std::strings. –  juanchopanza Feb 27 '13 at 19:41
    
Also, I can't use the arrow operator. –  Bobazonski Feb 27 '13 at 19:41
    
Rank and suit range from about 3 to 7 characters. –  Bobazonski Feb 27 '13 at 19:42
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3 Answers 3

The syntax is deckPtr->rank, deckPtr->suit, deckPtr->location = new char[...];.

But your coding style is more like C than C++. Instead, if you use modern C++, with convenient RAII classes like std::string, your code becomes much more simplified: just use std::string instead of raw char* pointers, and you don't have to pay attention to memory allocation and memory freeing: it's all automatically managed by std::string and destructors.

#include <string>

struct card
{
   std::string rank;
   std::string suit;
   char color;
   bool dealt;
   std::string location;
};

And instead of your custom stringCopy() function you can just use the "natural" operator= overload for std::string (i.e. destString = sourceString;).

And to build an array of 52 cards, just use std::vector:

#include <vector>

std::vector<card> cards(52);

Again, memory allocation is automatically managed by std::vector (and, unlike raw C arrays, you can query the vector for its own element count, using its size() method).

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1  
if they're not allowed to use the arrow operator, what are the chances they can use STL? –  Robert Mason Feb 27 '13 at 19:53
    
Robert is correct... you guessed it, no STL :) –  Bobazonski Feb 27 '13 at 19:55
1  
You should quit that course, it won't do you any good ... –  ahans Feb 27 '13 at 19:56
    
Is this a course on how to write bad quality code? :) –  Mr.C64 Feb 27 '13 at 21:54
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You probably want to use deckPtr->rank, deckPtr->suit, and deckPtr->location to assign something to the char pointers (alternatively, (*deckPtr).rank etc.). Note that * in char *var is not part of the name of the variable. It just states that the variable is a pointer to char.

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You need deckPtr->foo instead of deckPtr.*foo

Your problem is that the dereference operator is operating on foo, not on deckPtr, which makes no sense to the C++ compiler, so it uses instead the pointer to member operator. This operator is used to execute member function pointers on an object, which is completely different from accessing a member. Chances are good that in an intro-level c++ class (like it appears you are in) you will never have to worry about using or understanding that operator.

In general, in C/C++ whenever you have a pointer to a struct, you want to use the -> operator, not .. foo->bar is equivalent to (*foo).bar, but it keeps you from messing up and forgetting the parentheses. There's a reason that C had an arrow operator - it's easier and clearer. In my not-so-humble opinion, teachers that impose such arbitrary restrictions actually teach students to write bad code and reinvent wheels, but I don't have their experience in teaching programming...

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Arrow operator not allowed yet. She wants us to do it the hard way "for practice". –  Bobazonski Feb 27 '13 at 19:41
1  
Maybe you mean (*deckPtr).foo? –  Zach Feb 27 '13 at 19:42
    
@Zach, correct. –  Robert Mason Feb 27 '13 at 19:43
1  
@user1362548: you mean "to get it wrong" or "never really learn C++"? I'm not sure what not using the -> operator teaches you. That being said, the pointer-to-member operator .* is not the same as the -> operator. –  user7116 Feb 27 '13 at 19:43
    
When I try the arrow I get an imcompatible assignment error of "char* to char[10]" –  Bobazonski Feb 27 '13 at 19:44
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