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I am working on a multithreaded project in which I need to randomly find columns that I will be using in my SELECT sql and then I will be executing that SELECT sql query.

After finding those columns-

  1. I need to see whether the id is between the valid range, if it in between the Valid Range, then loop around the resultset using those columns from the columnsList and get the data back and store in a variable.
  2. else if id is not in the valid range, I need to check I am not getting any data back from the resultset. But somehow if I am getting the data back and flag is true to stop the program, then exit the program. Else if I am getting the data back but flag is false to stop the program, then count how many of those happening.

Below is my code-

private volatile int count;

@Override
public void run() {

.....

final String columnsList = getColumns(table.getColumns());
....
rs = preparedStatement.executeQuery();
....
if (Read.endValidRange < id && id < Read.startValidRange) {

    while (rs.next()) {
        for(String column: columnsList.split(",")) {
            System.out.println(column + ": " + rs.getString(column));
        }
    }
} else {
    if(rs.next() && Read.flagTerminate) {
        System.exit(1);
    } else {
        count++;
    }
}

....

}

/**
 * A simple method to get the column names in the order in which it was
 * inserted
 * 
 * @param columns
 * @return
 */
private String getColumns(final List<String> columns) {
    List<String> copy = new ArrayList<String>(columns);
    Collections.shuffle(copy);

    int rNumber = random.nextInt(columns.size());

    List<String> subList = copy.subList(0, rNumber);
    Collections.sort(subList, new Comparator<String>() {

        @Override
        public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
            return columns.indexOf(o1) < columns.indexOf(o2) ? -1 : 1;
        }
    });
    return StringUtils.join(subList, ",");
}

Problem Statement-

I am not able to understand how should I iterate through the resultset as every time I will be having different columns in my SELECT sql depending on what is getting generated. And apart from that how can I make it more cleaner in the if else loop.

share|improve this question
    
I am working on a project in which I need to randomly find columns that I need to use in my SELECT sql and then I will be executing that query. - what? –  Woot4Moo Feb 27 '13 at 19:52
    
Else if I am getting the data back but flag is false to stop the program, then count how many of those happening. What happenings are you talking about? –  Vishal K Feb 27 '13 at 20:25
    
else if I am getting the data back but flag is false to stop the program, then count how many of those has happened. By this I am trying to say just count those potential scenario. And when the program is over, then from the main thread print it out. That's all. –  AKIWEB Feb 27 '13 at 20:26
    
@Nevzz03: Since this code is shared among multiple threads so it needs proper synchronization to avoid Race condition.... –  Vishal K Feb 27 '13 at 20:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

OK.. You can have the Randomly generated columns saved in a String array..and then while iterating via resultset you use that array...as follows: UPDATE
You should not include those columns in select statement..Instead you should select all columns in select statement using *...and then get the value of that column in rs.next() loop...

rs = con.executeQuery("Select * from tablename");
while(rs.next())
{
   for (String col : columnsList )
   {
     System.out.print(rs.get(col));
   }
   System.out.print("\n");
}

UPDATE1
You need your critical code section written within run() to be wrapped in synchronized block so as to avoid Race Condition as follows:

private volatile int count;

@Override
public void run() {

.....
while (!Read.flagTerminate)
{
    synchronized(this)
    {
        if (!Read.flagTerminate)
        {
            String columnsList = getColumns(table.getColumns());
            ....
            rs = preparedStatement.executeQuery();
            ....
            if (Read.endValidRange < id && id < Read.startValidRange) 
            {
                while (rs.next()) 
                {
                    for(String column: columnsList.split(",")) 
                    {
                        System.out.println(column + ": " + rs.getString(column));
                    }
                }
            } 
            else 
            {
                while (rs.next())
                {
                    count++;
                }
            }
        }

    }
}
System.exit(0);//it implies that flag = true;

....

}

/**
 * A simple method to get the column names in the order in which it was
 * inserted
 * 
 * @param columns
 * @return
 */
private String getColumns(final List<String> columns) {
    List<String> copy = new ArrayList<String>(columns);
    Collections.shuffle(copy);

    int rNumber = random.nextInt(columns.size());

    List<String> subList = copy.subList(0, rNumber);
    Collections.sort(subList, new Comparator<String>() {

        @Override
        public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
            return columns.indexOf(o1) < columns.indexOf(o2) ? -1 : 1;
        }
    });
    return StringUtils.join(subList, ",");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Vishal, that makes sense. What about my second point problem. It is looking very ugly right now as I have made if else loop so many time. Any more cleaner way possible? –  AKIWEB Feb 27 '13 at 20:05
    
gaping security holes from unsanitized input –  Woot4Moo Feb 27 '13 at 20:08
    
@Woot4Moo: sorry...Can you explain your comment!!!? –  Vishal K Feb 27 '13 at 20:11
    
@VishalK sure. There is no santization being done on the strings that actually get passed into the initial query. Therefore someone can use SQL injection and iterate over column names that should be hidden. If you reference my latest update you can see an outline how to attack the problem. –  Woot4Moo Feb 27 '13 at 20:14
    
@VishalK. Can you tell me one more thing. Do I need to use volatile here to get the accurate count? –  AKIWEB Feb 27 '13 at 20:25

What about this:

if (Read.endValidRange < id && id < Read.startValidRange) {
    while (rs.next()) {
        for (String column : columnsList.split(",")) {
            System.out.println(column + ": " + rs.getString(column));
        }
    }
} else if (rs.next()) {
    if (Read.flagTerminate) {
        System.exit(1);
    } else {
        count++;
    }
}

I have also updated the if-else conditions as per my understanding of the question.

share|improve this answer
    
So it should be under while(rs.next()) { loop right? –  AKIWEB Feb 27 '13 at 20:02
    
Yes, that's right. –  Nishant Shreshth Feb 27 '13 at 20:03
    
Thanks Nishant. That makes sense. What about my second point problem. The way I have done currently, it looks very ugly with the way if else loop is setup. Any cleaner way of doing it? –  AKIWEB Feb 27 '13 at 20:06
    
Because the above code is incomplete I can't figure out the logic. Can you show more core? –  Nishant Shreshth Feb 27 '13 at 20:10
    
I see. If you read my question, I have two points there, That will tell the full pciture of if else loop. Let me know it is still donesn't make any sense –  AKIWEB Feb 27 '13 at 20:13

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