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This is building off another question,

Left join and only last row from right

Where I try to compose a second join using the same strategy. I'm running postgres 9.1.4 on my dev macbook pro. See this reduced example here:

SELECT * FROM (
    SELECT 
      post.*,
      comment.*,
      edit.*,
      ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY post.id ORDER BY edit.date_applied DESC) AS rna,
      ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY post.id ORDER BY comment.date_posted DESC) AS rnb
    FROM 
      post
    LEFT JOIN edit
      ON     post.id = edit.post_id
    LEFT JOIN comment
      ON     post.id = comment.post_id
    ORDER BY
      post.id DESC
) AS q
WHERE rna = 1 AND rnb = 1;

So what I am trying to do with this is to pull all the posts, with the most recent edit and the most recent comment. In my DB there are about 6000 posts, and about 100 comments per post, and maybe 10 edits per post.

Now if I run the query with either one of the joins, and not both, the query runs quite quickly (under a minute, not quite as quickly as I would like). BUT, if I run the query as I have presented it above, postgres chews through the remaining 14 GB on my SSD, and gives up after about 5 minutes.

Can anyone explain why this might happen? I expect it's my lack of understanding with respect to the PARTITION BY clause. Removing the joined tables from the SELECT clause and adding LIMITs to both in the subquery and outer query changed nothing.

Thanks for reading.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is probably that you are getting a cartesian product within one post id. For instance, if you have 100 edits and 100 comments, then your will end up with 10,000 rows due to the join.

The solution is to do the row_number() in subqueries:

SELECT post.*, comment.*, edit.*
FROM 
  post
LEFT JOIN (select e.*,
                  ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY post_id ORDER BY e.date_applied DESC) AS rna
           from edit e
           ) edit
  ON     post.id = edit.post_id and rna = 1
LEFT JOIN (select c.*,
                  ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY post_id ORDER BY c.date_posted DESC) AS rnb
           from comment c
          ) comment
  ON     post.id = comment.post_id and rnb = 1
ORDER BY
  post.id DESC
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent. Quick, and makes a lot of sense to help me understand. Thank you! –  Zak Patterson Feb 27 '13 at 20:52
    
The inner queries could be simplified using PostgreSQL DISTINCT ON. And the whole query can be even faster. –  Igor Romanchenko Feb 27 '13 at 20:55

Another way to do the query Gordon Linoff wrote:

SELECT post.*, comment.*, edit.*
FROM 
  post
LEFT JOIN (SELECT DISTINCT ON (e.post_id) e.*                  
           FROM edit e
           ORDER BY e.post_id DESC, e.date_applied DESC
           ) edit
  ON     post.id = edit.post_id
LEFT JOIN (SELECT DISTINCT ON (c.post_id) c.*
           FROM comment c
           ORDER BY c.post_id DESC, c.date_posted DESC
          ) comment
  ON     post.id = comment.post_id
ORDER BY
  post.id DESC

It may (or may not) be faster on your data. You have to test it.

share|improve this answer
    
Not bad, gave me about 20% boost in a quick test for this special case of really just needing one instance of each. Thanks! –  Zak Patterson Feb 27 '13 at 21:09

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