Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a figure with a percentage-based with. Within that box, I have an image with a transparent background. I need to center it horizontally, and pin it to the bottom of the container, while allowing the top to break out of the container (see image).

I can use absolute positioning to pin it to the bottom and break out of the top, but I can't get it centered. Is there a way to do it when I won't know the width of the image and the width of the container is flexible? Is display:table a possibility?

example My Code:

<figure class="feature">
<a href="#">
    <img src="image" /> 
    <p class="title-bar">Caption</p>
</a>
</figure>

.figure { position: relative; width: 50%; }
.figure img { position: absolute; bottom: 0; }
share|improve this question
    
Is the width of the image variable? –  Mooseman Apr 11 '13 at 20:28
    
@mooseman yes, the image width is also variable. –  artmem Apr 12 '13 at 0:11
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Please, check this fiddle, there is 2 variants to center an image

http://jsfiddle.net/GSKFD/

Markup is the same

<figure>
<a href="">
    <img src="http://placekitten.com/200/300" alt="" />
</a>
</figure>

General style for both methods

img{
        vertical-align: bottom;
    }

First variant

figure{
position: relative;
width: 50%;
height: 300px;
background: #cad;
}
figure a{
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 50%;
}
figure img{
    position: relative;
    left: -50%;
}

And the second one

figure{
    position: relative;
    width: 50%;    
    height: 300px;
    background: #cad;
}
figure a{
    position: absolute;
    width: 100%;
    left: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    text-align: center;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Awarded because this has slightly more succinct HTML & css than @Deborah's answer. –  Sam Sehnert Apr 15 '13 at 22:22
add comment

You can do this with pure CSS, but you need two additional divs to hold and position the elements.

Here's the CSS:

.featureHolder {
  position: relative;
  /* height can be anything */
  height: 200px;
}
.feature { 
  margin: 0;
  overflow: visible;
  /* width can be anything */ 
  width: 60%;  
  height: 100px;
  background: #cccccc; 
  position: absolute;
    bottom: 0;
}
.imageHolder { 
  text-align: center;
  width: 100%;
  position: absolute;
    bottom: 0;
}
img {
  margin-bottom: -5px;
}

Here's the HTML:

<div class="featureHolder">
  <figure class="feature">
    <div class="imageHolder">
        <a href="#">
            <img src="img" /> 
        </a>
    </div>
    <a href="#" class="title-bar">Caption</a>
  </figure>
</div>

Caption also can be positioned within the same a tag as the image, but in this example it's separated out so I didn't have to mess with it.

Here's a demo in JSFiddle - give .feature any width and img should still center. (BTW your CSS isn't right - it should be either 'figure' or '.feature', but can't be '.figure' as figure is an element with class name 'feature'.)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Basically you need to do a left: 50% then margin-left: -whatever the width of the image is. This will position it center in your relative div. My example assumes you do not know the width of the image.

http://jsfiddle.net/rVRT4/2/ http://jsfiddle.net/rVRT4/2/embedded/result/

$(document).ready(function(){
   var width = $(".figure img").width(); 
   $(".figure img").css("margin-left", -(width/2));     
});

.figure { position: relative; width: 50%; height: 500px;}
.figure img { position: absolute; bottom: 0; left:50%;}

<div class="figure">
<a href="#">
    <img src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/4TtEY.jpg" /> 
    <p class="title-bar">Caption</p>
</a>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a pure css way of doing this, without JavaScript? –  Sam Sehnert Apr 11 '13 at 21:09
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.