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I'd like to create a variable in dt according to a lookup table k. I'm getting some unexpected results depending on how I extract the variable of interest in k.

> dt <- data.table(x=c(1:10))
> setkey(dt, x)
> 
> k <- data.table(x=c(1:5,10), b=c(letters[1:5], "d"))
> setkey(k, x)
> 
> dt[,b:=k[.BY, list(b)],by=x]
> 
> dt  #unexpected results
     x  b
 1:  1  1
 2:  2  2
 3:  3  3
 4:  4  4
 5:  5  5
 6:  6  6
 7:  7  7
 8:  8  8
 9:  9  9
10: 10 10
> 
> dt <- data.table(x=c(1:10))
> setkey(x, x)
> 
> dt[,b:=k[.BY]$b,by=x]
> 
> dt  #expected results
     x  b
 1:  1  a
 2:  2  b
 3:  3  c
 4:  4  d
 5:  5  e
 6:  6 NA
 7:  7 NA
 8:  8 NA
 9:  9 NA
10: 10  d

Can anyone explain why this is happening?

share|improve this question
    
Is setkey(x, x) a typo? –  Arun Feb 27 '13 at 20:47
    
yes, i had earlier renamed my data.table to make things more clear. The unexpected results stand after fixing this. –  Michael Feb 27 '13 at 20:54
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't have to use by=. here at all.

First solution:

Set appropriate keys and use X[Y] syntax from data.table:

require(data.table)
dt <- data.table(x=c(1:10))
setkey(dt, "x")
k <- data.table(x=c(1:5,10), b=c(letters[1:5], "d"))
setkey(k, "x")

k[dt]

#      x  b
#  1:  1  a
#  2:  2  b
#  3:  3  c
#  4:  4  d
#  5:  5  e
#  6:  6 NA
#  7:  7 NA
#  8:  8 NA
#  9:  9 NA
# 10: 10  d

OP said that this creates a new data.table and it is undesirable for him.

Second solution

Again, without by:

dt <- data.table(x=c(1:10))
setkey(dt, "x")
k <- data.table(x=c(1:5,10), b=c(letters[1:5], "d"))
setkey(k, "x")

# solution
dt[k, b := i.b]

This does not create a new data.table and gives the solution you're expecting.

To explain why the unexpected result happens:

For the first case you do, dt[,b:=k[.BY, list(b)],by=x]. Here, k[.BY, list(b)] itself returns a data.table. For example:

k[list(x=1), list(b)]

#    x b
# 1: 1 a

So, basically, if you would do:

k[list(x=dt$x), list(b)]

That would give you the desired solution as well. To answer why you get what you get when you do b := k[.BY, list(b)], since, the RHS returns a data.table and you're assigning a variable to it, it takes the first element and drops the rest. For example, do this:

dt[, c := dt[1], by=x] 
# you'll get the whole column to be 1

For the second case, to understand why it works, you'll have to know the subtle difference between, accessing a data.table as k[6] and k[list(6)], for example:

In the first case, k[6], you are accessing the 6th element of k, which is 10 d. But in the second case, you're asking for a J, join. So, it searches for x = 6 (key column) and since there isn't any in k, it returns 6 NA. In your case, since you use k[.BY] which returns a list, it is a J operation, which fetches the right value.

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
That creates an entirely new data table which my method avoids. Additionally, I'm particularly interested in why the results depend on how I extract b from k –  Michael Feb 27 '13 at 20:27
    
First, .BY returns a list. So, you'll have to access k[.BY$x, b]. Actually, you can just access it as k[x, b]. I'm figuring out the other reason and how to get the solution as you require. –  Arun Feb 27 '13 at 20:35
    
k[x,b], I believe, would not be as efficient in the case where there are a large number of rows in each by group. –  Michael Feb 27 '13 at 20:39
    
Nope, it would be, if you set the key of k to be x. That's the idea of a key. –  Arun Feb 27 '13 at 20:40
1  
+10! I didn't know about the 'taking the first element and dropping the rest' bit. Seems like data.table could do with a new warning in that case? –  Matt Dowle Feb 27 '13 at 21:49
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