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I Have implemented a Socket Listener to read data sent from a GPS, but it is consumming 90% of my CPU. I know it's my code causing this, but I cant see where.

This is my main Class:

public class PortToDB {

    ServerSocket serverSocket = null;

    public void listenSocket(){
        try{
            serverSocket = new ServerSocket(50000);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println("Could not listen on port 50000. " + e);
            System.exit(-1);
        }

        while(true){
            GPSData gd;
            try{
                gd = new GPSData(serverSocket.accept());
                Thread t = new Thread(gd);
                t.start();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                System.out.println("Accept failed: 50000. " + e);
                System.exit(-1);
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {    
        PortToDB portToDb = new PortToDB();
        portToDb.listenSocket();
    }
}

This is my Runnable Class:

class GPSData implements Runnable {

    private Socket client;
    DBHandler dbhandler = new DBHandler();

    GPSData(Socket client) { this.client = client; }

    public void run(){
        String line;
        BufferedReader in = null;

    try{
        in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(client.getInputStream()));
    } catch (IOException e) {
        System.out.println("in or out failed");
        System.exit(-1);
    }

    while(true){
      try{
          if((line = in.readLine()) != null){
              dbhandler.dbInsert(line);
          }
      } catch (IOException e) {
          System.out.println("Read failed");
          System.exit(-1);
      }
    }
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
Code Review may be able to help/a better place to ask. –  Gyhth Feb 27 '13 at 20:59
    
How many threads are getting created overall, how often, and how many are running at the same time? Does high CPU use start immediately after some use? –  hyde Feb 27 '13 at 21:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If readLine() returns null you must close the socket, exit the read loop, and forget about that client. You are spinning at EOS.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry what does EOS mean? –  FeleMed Feb 27 '13 at 21:34
    
EOS means End Of Stream. –  EJP Feb 27 '13 at 21:36

Instead of creating new thread for each incoming request, use a thread pool:

private ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(15);

// ...

gd = new GPSData(serverSocket.accept());
executor.submit(gd);

This way, you will eliminate the overhead of creating unlimited threads at the time of receiving requests and instead creating limited threads even before opening the socket port to receive the requests.


Also, as @EJB said, exit the client for-loop whenever you receive null from readLine() as an indicator of the end of the stream (EOS).

share|improve this answer
    
What if the number of connections is exceeding 15?? –  Vishal K Feb 27 '13 at 21:06
    
@VishalK They will wait until a thread finishes its job. –  Eng.Fouad Feb 27 '13 at 21:07
    
You could also add a small Thread.sleep in the read thread. This should reduce some of load and allow some of the other threads an opportunity to process there data –  MadProgrammer Feb 27 '13 at 21:09
    
Wont' that lead to overhead for other waiting Connections?? –  Vishal K Feb 27 '13 at 21:09
1  
This is all irrelevant. He doesn't need a sleep in the read thread. Read is a blocking operation. Changing to a thread pool won't solve a problem of 100% CPU usage. –  EJP Feb 27 '13 at 21:25

Thanks to all who answered my question.

I've solved this by combining Eng.Fouad's and EJP's suggestion:

This is what I Changed in my code:

Executor:

    private ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(15);

    try{
        gd = new GPSData(serverSocket.accept());
        executor.submit(gd);
    }

Looping control:

    try{            
        while((line = in.readLine()) != null){         
        dbhandler.dbInsert(line);
        }
    }

Now the process stays stuck at 0% :).

Thanks EJP and Eng.Fouad.

share|improve this answer
    
@Eng.Fouad I'd like to know if you guys agree with this. –  FeleMed Feb 27 '13 at 22:01
    
@EJP I'd like to know if you guys agree with this. –  FeleMed Feb 27 '13 at 22:02
    
I agree with my answer. I don't agree that you need a thread pool. at all, unless you are accepting hundreds or thousands of connections per second, when all you said was 'a GPS'; and I certainly don't agree with a fixed size thread pool of 15, unless you only want to service 15 clients at once and let the rest wait, which also isn't mentioned in your question. –  EJP Feb 27 '13 at 22:44
1  
@EJP I understand what you are saying, but I'll have to be more specific. In this particular case I'm testing A (one) GPS connection with approximately 50 seconds between each update, I am now developing inside a developing machine. When this goes to production there will be (as far as today) 45 GPSs updating approximately each 1-2 minutes. I'm not sure about how to calculate the exact amount of threads I should implement in the thread pool, but 15 seems like a good margin to allow this some growing space. I'm open to more information so far you have been very helpful. –  FeleMed Feb 28 '13 at 1:11
    
@EJP I agree with you that the endless loop in the client code is the cause of the 100% CPU usage, but I disagree with you when you said that the OP does not need a thread pool. What about the overhead of creating a new thread for each incoming request?! –  Eng.Fouad Feb 28 '13 at 17:27

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