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I've been reading the [golang-book]: http://www.golang-book.com and completing the excercises as I go along. In Chapter 6, there is an exercise that must find the smallest element in an unsorted list[x].

I have the following code but somehow I don't know why the method length (len) gives me an error on line 14: x.len undefined (type []int has no field or method len)

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
    x := []int{
        48, 96, 86, 68,
        57, 82, 63, 70,
        37, 34, 83, 27,
        19, 97, 9, 17,
    }

    small := x[0]
    for i := 1; i < x.len(); i++ {
        if x[i] < small {
            fmt.Println(x[i])
        }
    }
}

The logic I used was Googled so perhaps there is no len method on arrays? Any help is greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
"The logic I used was Googled..." I don't know what that means, but no, there's no len() method on Arrays. I would imagine the book describes how to properly get the length of an Array. – the system Feb 27 '13 at 21:06
    
...yep, quick look through chapter 6 answers your question. – the system Feb 27 '13 at 21:08
    
As @Daniel mentioned, length is not a method of slice, but rather built in as global function, understood. But, why does the compiler give me six elements (37 34 27 19 9 17) and not the unique value of 9 ? (9 being smallest int found in x) – Alex Feb 27 '13 at 21:47
    
Because you asked it to: fmt.Println(x[i]). – peterSO Feb 27 '13 at 21:58
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Arrays and slices do not have a len() method. The len() function is a language built-in.

So your code

for i := 1; i < x.len(); i++ {

Should be

for i := 1; i < len(x); i++ {

Here is a working version in the playground.

package main

import "fmt"

func main(){
    x := []int{
        48,96,86,68,
        57,82,63,70,
        37,34,83,27,
        19,97, 9,17,
    }   

    small := x[0]
    for i := 1; i < len(x); i++ {
        if x[i] < small { 
        fmt.Println(x[i]);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have branched your code with a small change to avoid evaluating len(x) on every loop: play.golang.org/p/QS-Ov9PeyY – thwd Feb 27 '13 at 22:29
    
@Tom; There is no point in doing that. It doesn't cost anything to evaluate len(x). – peterSO Feb 27 '13 at 22:50
    
@peterSO: No cost? Are you sure about that? – the system Feb 28 '13 at 0:12
1  
@the system: Yes. A slice is a descriptor of an array segment. It consists of a pointer to the array segment, the length of the segment, and its capacity (the maximum length of the segment). The len built-in function obtains the length of the segment from the descriptor. – peterSO Feb 28 '13 at 1:28
    
@peterSO: So when you say it doesn't cost anything, you mean it doesn't need to calculate the length, but it does need to read the length. In other words, it doesn't perform the len() once, and then automatically cache the result. – the system Feb 28 '13 at 1:40

len() isn't a method of a slice. It's a global function. You want to say len(x).

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
    x := []int{
        48, 96, 86, 68,
        57, 82, 63, 70,
        37, 34, 83, 27,
        19, 97, 9, 17,
    }

    small := x[0]
    for i := 1; i < len(x); i++ {
        if x[i] < small {
            fmt.Println(x[i])
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

In fact, array- and slice-types can have a len() method, like this:

http://play.golang.org/p/CkU4LJZgUb

package main

import "fmt"

type SliceType []int

func (s SliceType) len() int {
    return len(s)
}

func main() {
    s := SliceType{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9}
    for i := 0; i < s.len(); i++ {
        fmt.Println(s[i])
    }
}

The code you found is probably an implementation of container/list or container/ring, both of which specify a Len() method.

Primitive slices and arrays, though, don't have any methods attached to them and you must use the built-in function len().

share|improve this answer

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