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I would like to write a method that will await for a variable to be set to true.

Here is the psudo code.

bool IsSomethingLoading = false
SomeData TheData;

public async Task<SomeData> GetTheData()
{
   await IsSomethingLoading == true;
   return TheData;
}

TheData will be set by a Prism Event along with the IsSomethingLoading variable.

I have a call to the GetTheData method, but I would like it to run async (right now it just returns null if the data is not ready. (That leads to other problems.)

Is there a way to do this?

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1  
Why don't use a wait handle? –  Xaqron Feb 27 '13 at 21:45
    
it feels like something is missing here.. shouldn't the await IsSomethingLoading == true rather be await InitiateLoading();? –  Default Feb 27 '13 at 21:46
    
@EricLippert - I think I want an asynchronous wait. (But I am not sure.) My calling method will set a wait indicator on part of the screen. When the caller returns the wait indicator will be removed. But I need the UI responsive during the time the wait indicator is showing. The "Callback" style of Async/Await seems to offer this... –  Vaccano Feb 27 '13 at 21:51
1  
@Vaccano If you're going to be using the TPL a lot you likely don't need to be using a BackgroundWorker much, or at all. Just use Task.Run to do work in a background thread, await the task, and then all of the code that uses the result goes after the await. Much quicker to write, easier error handling, all around goodness. –  Servy Feb 27 '13 at 22:01
1  
@Vaccano As I showed in my answer, you can use a TaskCompletionSource to convert code using an older model into a Task, so that you can then await it, but ideally, over time, or for future products, you'd use Task all the way through; it makes it easier if you do. –  Servy Feb 27 '13 at 22:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

In many situations like this what you need is a TaskCompletionSource.

You likely have a method that is able to generate the data at some point in time, but it doesn't use a task to do it. Perhaps there is a method that takes a callback which provides the result, or an event that is fired to indicate that there is a result, or simply code using a Thread or ThreadPool that you are not inclined to re-factor into using Task.Run.

public Task<SomeData> GetTheData()
{
    TaskCompletionSource<SomeData> tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<SomeData>();
    SomeObject worker = new SomeObject();
    worker.WorkCompleted += result => tcs.SetResult(result);
    worker.DoWork();
    return tcs.Task;
}

While you may need/want to provide the TaskCompletionSource to the worker, or some other class, or in some other way expose it to a broader scope, I've found it's often not needed, even though it's a very powerful option when it's appropriate.

It's also possible that you can use Task.FromAsync to create a task based on an asynchronous operation and then either return that task directly, or await it in your code.

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You could use a TaskCompletionSource as your signal, and await that:

TaskCompletionSource<bool> IsSomethingLoading = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();
SomeData TheData;

public async Task<SomeData> GetTheData()
{
   await IsSomethingLoading.Task;
   return TheData;
}

And in your Prism event do:

IsSomethingLoading.SetResult(true);
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1  
Why have a TCS<bool> and not a TCS<SomeData> directly? –  Servy Feb 27 '13 at 21:50

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