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In a question I asked several months ago, I asked if the effect of Jetsam on memory usage can be observed. I answered my own question using instruments, finding that apps killed by Jetsam still had the same memory footprint that they had before they were terminated.

Even today, I still see jettisoned apps in the running task bar recently-used app list. I don't get any performance improvement unless I remove them myself, even after Jetsam has killed them.

If that's the case, what is the purpose of Jetsam and what is it doing (other than killing apps)? I don't see any benefits. Is this a bug?

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Even today, I still see jettisoned apps in the running task bar. I don't get any performance improvement unless I remove them myself, even after Jetsam has killed them.

Poppycock. There's no such thing as a "running task bar". You're thinking of the list of recently-used apps. The presence of an app in this bar does not indicate that the app is still running, and removing killed apps from this bar has no effect on performance/memory. The only thing removing an app does from this bar that is beneficial is it kills the app if it was still running.

As for jetsammed apps, it's not surprising that the app will have the same memory footprint after it's relaunched. Apps are typically jetsammed because they're suspended and the foreground app needs more memory. The fact that an app is jetsammed does not indicate that the app was necessarily using an unacceptable amount of memory.

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I may have called it by the wrong name. And I am referring to jettisoned apps that have not been restarted. My tests with instruments showed that they still had the same footprint that they had while running. It was only after I deleted them from the "recently-used apps" list that their memory footprint went away in Instruments. –  Jim Feb 27 '13 at 21:52
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@Jim: You're being tricked. A dead app isn't actually using resources. But the OS may actually keep the memory pages around if nothing else needs them, so that relaunching the app is faster (because it doesn't have to load any readonly content, such as the text segments, back into memory). However, if anything else on the system needs the memory, they can be reallocated to the new app without any performance penalty. –  Kevin Ballard Feb 27 '13 at 21:56
    
Okay. I've learned something here about the multi-tasking and the recently-used apps list (support.apple.com/kb/ht4211). But it still leaves my question unanswered. What is the benefit of Jetsam, if I have to remove the app from the recently-used bar before I see the performance improvement. I have had to do this to stop crashes in the past. –  Jim Feb 27 '13 at 22:03
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@Jim: What do you mean by "before I see the performance improvement"? A dead app is a dead app is a dead app. It doesn't reserve any resources or cause any performance impact. –  Kevin Ballard Feb 27 '13 at 22:05
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