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i get a segmentation fault

so at the top i have typedef char * string;

then i just have a variable called spaces that is set to around 5

for(i=0; i<=spaces; i++) {
    sepwords[i] = malloc(3000);
}

str is a char array, i am looking for spaces and copying until then

while(str[i]!=' ') {


    printf("%d\n", i);
    strcpy(sepwords[i], "hello");
    i++;

}

so that actually works

however if I do

while(str[i]!=' ') {
    char *temp[100];
    *temp=str[i];


    printf("%d\n", i);
    strcpy(sepwords[i], *temp);
    i++;




}

it seg faults in this

i don't think this is because i am using typedef string, because i allocated memory beforehand.

any ideas?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#define MAXLINE 256

char *progn;

void usage(void) {
    fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s pattern\n", progn);
}
typedef char * string;

int pattern_match(char *pattern, char *str) {






int i=0;
int spaces=0;

while(str[i]!=0) {
    if(str[i]==' ') {
        spaces++;
    }
    i++;
}
string sepwords[spaces];





for(i=0; i<=spaces; i++) {
    sepwords[i] = malloc(3000);
}


i=0;


while(str[i]!=' ') {
    char *temp[100];
    *temp=str[i];


    printf("%d\n", i);
    strcpy(sepwords[i], temp);
    i++;




}









//printf("%d\n", spaces);



//strs[0]="hiya boy";
//printf(strs[1]);





}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {

    char line[MAXLINE];
    char *pattern;
    progn = argv[0];

    if (argc != 2) {
        usage();
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    pattern = argv[1];

    while (!feof(stdin) && !ferror(stdin)) {
        if (!fgets(line, sizeof (line), stdin)) {
            break;
        }
        if (pattern_match(pattern, line)) {
            printf("%s", line);
        }
    }
    if (ferror(stdin)) {
        perror(progn);
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
share|improve this question
    
On which platform are you ? Try memory debugger tools. –  Zaffy Feb 27 '13 at 22:34
    
I think you have not grasped the semantics and probably the syntax of C declarations. A useful trick is to read them starting from the identifier, go right through any brackets, then left through *s and qualifers, so char * temp[100] reads as "temp is an array of 100 pointers to char" –  Clyde Feb 27 '13 at 22:36
    
I'd suggest you explain what it is that you are actually trying to achieve. It's not obvious from the code fragments you posted. –  Clyde Feb 27 '13 at 22:37
    
it's supposed to open a text file and then only print the lines that meet the user input given criteria but first i want it to seperate each word in the line into its own string. that's what that loop is doing, going through each letter of the line, and then adding it to the string. the char* pointer array was an accident, whoops. i had it right in my code –  user2054534 Feb 27 '13 at 22:53
    
Just beginning to understand what you intended to do with your code, cause it's not very straightforward. You only have one index (i) for two separate things (index in the input string - str - and in the splitted words list - sepwords). You must have two. Well even 3 if you still want use your code like it is: one for the input pos, one for the current sepwords, one for the position in this word. Then you have to add \0 at the end of the sepwords. It's a good thing to learn how those things work, but you should consider strchr (to find space) or strtok (to do all the job for you). –  huelbois Feb 27 '13 at 23:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You've got two syntax mistakes in your code. Your compiler must have warned you about them:

*temp=str[i];

temp is char*[100], *temp is equivalent to temp[0] which is a char *. But str[i] is char. So you're putting a char (single byte) into a char* (address).

strcpy(sepwords[i], temp);

temp is the address of the full array of 100 char*, so you're copying like a big string until some zero byte is found.

There is also this error:

string sepwords[spaces];

for(i=0; i<=spaces; i++) {

sepwords[i] = malloc(3000);

it's : i < spaces, not i<=spaces because string sepwords[spaces] allocates a "spaces"-length array, from 0 to spaces-1.

Last: If your input contains no space, there is no end condition to the while(str[i] != ' ') This is where you get your seg fault (gdb is your friend), because you end up looking after the end of str (past the last \0 byte)

share|improve this answer
    
so how do i get around the strcpy issue? –  user2054534 Feb 28 '13 at 6:17
  1. instead of defining char* as string, define it as pchar. a char* is not a string, it is a pointer to a character, which may or may not be an address of a character, possibly followed in memory by other characters terminated by 0. This is important because value of undefined_pchar = segmentation fault. value of an undefined_string = "".

  2. fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s pattern\n", progn); This prints progn which is undefined. It could be illegal memory, or possibly random collection of memory. In either case bad. So you should indicate when you declare your progn pchar progn = 0 indicating that you understand this concept.

  3. sepwords is a char*, sepwords[i] is a char, by saying sepwords[i] = malloc(3000), if it even compiles at all, would be misuse of notation. use a pchar* instead in order to create a list of c style strings.

    for(i=0; i<=spaces; i++) { sepwords[i] = malloc(3000); }

I'd love to give a shot at finding the error, however the intent has to be somewhat clear for me to understand what you are trying to do, either through comments, or by proper type usage.

share|improve this answer
    
strncpy is not a magical version of strcpy, it has a different semantics and it doesn't fix errors by itself. –  wRAR Feb 27 '13 at 22:35
    
And assertions don't help if you don't really know what you're trying to do. –  Clyde Feb 27 '13 at 22:36
    
If you use assertions, you are certain that you know what you're trying to do. If not, then you cannot post code samples, you have to post the intent. Without a clear intent, the code will not work, or be fundamentally flawed. –  Dmitry Feb 27 '13 at 23:09

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