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I have multiple objects in a hierarchy which have common properties and methods inherited from the superclass, and object-specific properties and methods in the subclasses. I'm still new to OOP javascript, so there is probably a much better approach to this. I'm using jQuery for the AJAX, but not sure if that makes any difference.

function Obj(input) {
    this.in = input;
    this.out = {
        content: this.in,
        category: {},
        owner: utils.getValidUser(),
        state: 0,
        meta: {}
    };
    this.process = function() {
       console.log("No Process Defined");
    }
}

function MovieObj(input) {
    this.inheritFrom = Obj;
    this.inheritFrom();
    this.out.type = "movie";
}

function ActionMovie(input) {
        this.inheritFrom = MovieObj;
        this.inheritFrom();
        this.out.genre = "action";
        this.process = function() {
            console.log("movie search");
            $.getJSON("/api/search/"+ escape(this.out.content),
              function(data) {
                /* 
                   I want to modify the object properties according to
                   what comes back from the ajax call.
                */
            });
        }
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is a prototypical approach to my earlier code, AND a simple reference to the calling object, which solves both the inheritance issues and the scope issues.

// Define Superclass
function Obj(input) {
    this.content = input;
    this.type = "object";
    this.owner = utils.getValidUser();
    this.state = 0;
}
Obj.prototype.process = function() {
       console.log("No Process Defined");
};


// Define Movie Subclass
function MovieObj(input) {
    Obj.call(this, input); 
    this.type = "movie";
}
MovieObj.prototype = new Obj();

// Define ActionMovie as subclass of Movie and apply new process method.
function ActionMovie(input) {
    MovieObj.call(this, input);
    this.genre = "action";
}
ActionMovie.prototype = new MovieObj();
ActionMovie.prototype.process = function() {
            var _obj = this;
            $.getJSON("/api/search/"+ escape(this.content),
              function(data) {
                /* 
                   I want to modify the object properties according to
                   what comes back from the ajax call.
                */
                _obj.meta.title data.title;
            });
        }
}

This is now actually working, but there are some caveats. As written, the constructors for the superclass are called everytime a new object is defined, so a lot of unnecessary calls are made.

This code is based on information contained in the following link, which also describes a workaround that is Mozilla specific: http://www.spheredev.org/wiki/Prototypes_in_JavaScript

share|improve this answer

Aw, kinda strange approach to Object Oriented JavaScript :)

As I get you want implement model you're using in other languages you familiar with to construct your object. I'm about this.inheritFrom . In JS there aren't classes, objects are inheriting directly from objects. One way (there are a lot of discussions in the web) is to do it with new keyword, as

var MovieObj = new Obj(input);
MovieObj.out.type = "movie";

For all pleasure you need to get familiar with prototype inheritance, and your code will look like

function Obj(input){
    /* some stuff here */
};

function MovieObj(){};
MovieObj.prototype = new Obj();
MovieObj.prototype.constructor = MovieObj();
MovieObj.protorype.out.type = 'movie';

var actionMovie = new MovieObj();
/* do some stuff here with your final object actionMovie */

Hope it'll help you understand difference between oo js and other oo languages. Feel free to ask in comments if anything not clear (sorry for my English).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this. I rewrote my code the protypical way. This is somewhat correct it turns out but it didn't work as written. The main thing is that you have forgotten to call the constructor within the subclass's constructor. (see the final answer). –  FilmJ Oct 6 '09 at 0:32
    
Nice code, thanks for pointing me where I'm wrong. btw, what's your coding language background ? –  Mushex Antaranian Oct 6 '09 at 1:34

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