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I have a ndarray. From this array I need to choose the list of N numbers with biggest values. I found heapq.nlargest to find the N largest entries, but I need to extract the indexes. I want to build a new array where only the N rows with the largest weights in the first column will survive. The rest of the rows will be replaced by random values

import numpy as np
import heapq   # For choosing list of max values
a = [[1.1,2.1,3.1], [2.1,3.1,4.1], [5.1,0.1,7.1],[0.1,1.1,1.1],[4.1,3.1,9.1]]
a = np.asarray(a)
maxVal = heapq.nlargest(2,a[:,0])

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print a
    print maxVal

The output I have is:

[[ 1.1  2.1  3.1]
[ 2.1  3.1  4.1]
[ 5.1  0.1  7.1]
[ 0.1  1.1  1.1]
[ 4.1  3.1  9.1]]

[5.0999999999999996, 4.0999999999999996]

but what I need is [2,4] as the indexes to build a new array. The indexes are the rows so if in this example I want to replace the rest by 0 I need to finish with:

[[0.0  0.0  0.0]
[ 0.0  0.0  0.0]
[ 5.1  0.1  7.1]
[ 0.0  0.0  0.0]
[ 4.1  3.1  9.1]]

I am stuck in the point where I need indexes. The original array has 1000 rows and 100 columns. The weights are normalized floating points and I don't want to do something like if a[:,1] == maxVal[0]: because sometimes I have the weights very close and can finish with more values maxVal[0] than my original N.

Is there any simple way to extract indexes on this setup to replace the rest of the array?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you only have 1000 rows, I would forget about the heap and use np.argsort on the first column:

>>> np.argsort(a[:,0])[::-1][:2]
array([2, 4])

If you want to put it all together, it would look something like:

def trim_rows(a, n) :
    idx = np.argsort(a[:,0])[:-n]
    a[idx] = 0

>>> a = np.random.rand(10, 4)
>>> a

array([[ 0.34416425,  0.89021968,  0.06260404,  0.0218131 ],
       [ 0.72344948,  0.79637177,  0.70029863,  0.20096129],
       [ 0.27772833,  0.05372373,  0.00372941,  0.18454153],
       [ 0.09124461,  0.38676351,  0.98478492,  0.72986697],
       [ 0.84789887,  0.69171688,  0.97718206,  0.64019977],
       [ 0.27597241,  0.26705301,  0.62124467,  0.43337711],
       [ 0.79455424,  0.37024814,  0.93549275,  0.01130491],
       [ 0.95113795,  0.32306471,  0.47548887,  0.20429272],
       [ 0.3943888 ,  0.61586129,  0.02776393,  0.2560126 ],
       [ 0.5934556 ,  0.23093912,  0.12550062,  0.58542137]])
>>> trim_rows(a, 3)
>>> a

array([[ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ],
       [ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ],
       [ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ],
       [ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ],
       [ 0.84789887,  0.69171688,  0.97718206,  0.64019977],
       [ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ],
       [ 0.79455424,  0.37024814,  0.93549275,  0.01130491],
       [ 0.95113795,  0.32306471,  0.47548887,  0.20429272],
       [ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ],
       [ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ]])

And for your data size it's probably fast enough:

In [7]: a = np.random.rand(1000, 100)

In [8]: %timeit -n1 -r1 trim_rows(a, 50)
1 loops, best of 1: 7.65 ms per loop
share|improve this answer
    
It's probably less costly to retrieve the N last numbers first and then reverse them, instead of reversing the entire list. Something like np.argsort(a[:,0])[-2:][::-1] –  entropy Feb 27 '13 at 23:21
    
@entropy They are both basically zero-cost operations, since no actual data shuffling happens, just strides, shapes and pointers being moved around. With a = np.arange(10**6) I get these timings: In [23]: %timeit a[-2:][::-1] 1000000 loops, best of 3: 740 ns per loop and In [24]: %timeit a[::-1][:2] 1000000 loops, best of 3: 731 ns per loop. –  Jaime Feb 27 '13 at 23:34
    
you're probably right, I don't know how python's list implementation works. If indeed it doesn't actually reverse the underlying array, just changes the stride and start/end pointers then you're absolutely right –  entropy Feb 27 '13 at 23:37
    
@entropy Python lists do have a cost associated with reversing them, and then your observation is spot on. Again with a = range(10**6) these are the timings: In [26]: %timeit a[::-1][:2] 100 loops, best of 3: 9.54 ms per loop and In [27]: %timeit a[-2:][::-1] 1000000 loops, best of 3: 333 ns per loop so your approach then is x30,000 times faster. It just doesn't apply to numpy arrays. –  Jaime Feb 27 '13 at 23:43
    
Aaah, I missed the fact that np.argsort() returns a numpy array. My bad :) –  entropy Feb 27 '13 at 23:46

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