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total newbie here.

So is there any way to stop a functioning from being executed if certain condition is met?

Here is my source code:

answer = raw_input("2+2 = ")
if answer == "4":
    print "Correct"
else:
    print "Wrong answer, let's try something easier"
    answer = raw_input("1+1 = ")
if answer == "2":
    print "Correct!"
else:
    print "False"

So basically, if I put 4 on the first question, I will get the "False" comment from the "else" function below. I want to stop that from happening if 4 is input on the first question.

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1  
You have problem with your indent. Also I believe this is less Python-related, more about control structures in general and basics of programming. –  Tadeck Feb 27 '13 at 23:26
    
I don't know what indent is. And yes, this is basic programming, that's what I need help with. –  c0ldpr0xy Feb 27 '13 at 23:27

2 Answers 2

Indentation level is significant in Python. Just indent the second if statement so it's a part of the first else.

answer = raw_input("2+2 = ")
if answer == "4":
    print "Correct"
else:
    print "Wrong answer, let's try something easier"
    answer = raw_input("1+1 = ")

    if answer == "2":
        print "Correct!"
    else:
        print "False"
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks dude, that fixed it. –  c0ldpr0xy Feb 27 '13 at 23:30

You can place the code inside a function and return as soon any given condition is met:

def func():
    answer = raw_input("2+2 = ")
    if answer == "4":
        print "Correct"
        return
    else:
        print "Wrong answer, let's try something easier"
        answer = raw_input("1+1 = ")
    if answer == "2":
        print "Correct!"
    else:
        print "False"

output:

>>> func()
2+2 = 4
Correct
>>> func()
2+2 = 3
Wrong answer, let's try something easier
1+1 = 2
Correct!
share|improve this answer
    
Ashwini, thanks for that, but I haven't made it to the "define" statement yet, I am still trying to wrap my head around the indents, which seems extremely important. Cheers –  c0ldpr0xy Feb 27 '13 at 23:36

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