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I have a text file that reads like this:

"two spade three spade four spade"... and so on.

I am extracting the words using this code:

   char *temp;
   temp = new char[20];

   fin >> *temp;
   charCount=stringLength(temp);
   deckPtr->rank = new char[charCount+1];
   stringCopy(temp, deckPtr->rank);

   fin >> *temp;
   charCount=stringLength(temp);
   deckPtr->suit = new char[charCount+1];
   stringCopy(temp, deckPtr->suit);

The second and third parts are in a loop that goes on to the next "card" after it writes all the struct members.

(stringCopy and stringLength are functions I wrote myself and they have been tested to work)

Later, when I cout the struct members, I find that only one chracter has been extracted at a time. For example, the rank of the first element is 't', the suit is 'w', and then it continues into the suit and rank of the next card with 'o' and 's'... Obviously, one character at a time is being extracted. How do I get the whole string, terminating at whitespace?

share|improve this question
    
Can't use vectors, this is for a class project. – Bobazonski Feb 27 '13 at 23:56
    
If you can use vector you are not using C++ just C. It also makes the problem a lot harder. – Loki Astari Feb 27 '13 at 23:58
    
Tell my teacher that ;) – Bobazonski Feb 27 '13 at 23:59

The problem is that:

fin >> *temp;

<stream> >> <char>

So it will only read a char.
You are reading a char from a stream.

What you want is to read a string (or a word)

<stream>  >> <C-String>

// This is expressed as:
fin >> temp; // Note no '*'

If you write this using std::string and std::vector its about 10 lines of code. Writing it like this in C with some C++ features will make it much harder to write correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
Ahh, I knew it was a simple syntactical thing. I can't wrap my head around pointers for the life of me; I thought this would try to assign the string the the memory address and I'd get an error. Thank you so much. – Bobazonski Feb 28 '13 at 0:03

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