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I attempted a program to return an array with the indicies of the array where a specific inputed value is found, but every run results in an error, which seems to be an infinite run time. The error seems to be occuring right after printing out the last of the indicies found.

Can anyone help? (Side note: I've seen multiple pages about deleting pointers when done with them; should I be doing that here?)

Forgot to mention - I want the first slot of the returned array to save the size of the array, so that it can be accessed easily later on in the program

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

int* linearSearch(int* n, int k, int f) {
    // Input: Index 0 Address ; Size of Array; Element to Search
    // Output: Array of Found Indicies
    vector <int> a;
    int* b;
    for(int i = 0; i < k; i++)
        if(n[i] == f)
            a.push_back(i);
    *b = a.size();
    for(int i = 0; i < a.size(); i++)
        b[i + 1] = a[i];
    return b;
}

int main() {
    int c[10] = {4, 4, 6, 3, 7, 7, 3, 6, 2, 0};
    int* k = linearSearch(&c[0], sizeof(c)/sizeof(int), 4);
    for(int i = 0; i < k[0]; i++) {
        cout << "Found at index: " << k[i + 1] << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
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What do you think the line *b = a.size(); does? –  Floris Feb 27 '13 at 23:57
    
Forgot to mention - I want the first slot of the returned array to save the size of the array, so that it can be accessed easily later on in the program. –  John Jazzer Feb 28 '13 at 0:00
    
Where do you allocate space for b to point to, then? –  Floris Feb 28 '13 at 0:02

4 Answers 4

int* b;
....
*b = a.size();

b has to be allocated. Try following:

int* b = new int[a.size() + 1];
b[0] = a.size();

I see what you meant. b will have magically length in first element. This was in Pascal/Delphi but not the case in C/C++.

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What do you mean by "b has to be allocated"? I'll try this out and see if it works, but can you explain why this works and mine doesn't? –  John Jazzer Feb 27 '13 at 23:58
    
@JohnJazzer no offence, but allocation (more generally memory management) is one of the core concepts in C/C++. May be it is better to read some books or at least tutorials before jumping to coding? More specifically int* b; means "create a variable capable of pointing to memory location with integer(s)". Fine! But no space in memory is allocated for array and you have to do that, hence allocate. –  Andrey Feb 28 '13 at 0:02
    
Ah, beautiful - it worked. Now to figure out what that first line means –  John Jazzer Feb 28 '13 at 0:03
    
@John: It's because b starts out as a brand new pointer to absolutely nowhere (or anywhere). Such a wild pointer isn't useful for anything. –  Ben Voigt Feb 28 '13 at 0:03
    
Ah this does make sense - I'm new to C++, so I'll have try reading up on it. Thanks! –  John Jazzer Feb 28 '13 at 0:05

You are writing to heap memory that you never claimed.

int* b;

This pointer, having never been initialized, points to an undefined memory address. Then when you use the indexing operator to assign your matches, you are writing to the subsequent bytes following the undefined memory address.

You need to allocate space for storing the results using the 'new[]' operator. Additionally, if you had correctly claimed the memory, you would be assigning the number of match results to the first element in the result array - something that doesn't seem to be your intention.

Take a look at dynamic memory allocation in C++ using the new [] operator.

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If you use std::vector anyway, why not to use it where it is needed the most? Also if you not suppose to modify array by that pointer express that by const pointer:

std::vector<int> linearSearch(const int* n, int k, int f)
{
   std::vector<int> res;
   for(int i = 0; i < k; i++)
        if(n[i] == f) res.push_back(i);
   return res;
}

int main() {
    int c[10] = {4, 4, 6, 3, 7, 7, 3, 6, 2, 0};
    std::vector<int> k = linearSearch(&c[0], sizeof(c)/sizeof(int), 4);
    for(int i = 0; i < k.size(); i++) {
        cout << "Found at index: " << k[i] << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
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This is not perfect but this is much closer to a correct implementation and you should be able to take it further with some work:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

std::vector<int> linearSearch(int* n, int k, int f)
{
  vector <int> a;

  for(int i = 0; i < k; i++)
  {
      if(n[i] == f)
      {
          a.push_back(i);
      }
  }

  return a ;
}

int main() {
  int c[10] = {4, 4, 6, 3, 7, 7, 3, 6, 2, 0};
  std::vector<int> result = linearSearch(&c[0], sizeof(c)/sizeof(int), 4);

  for(unsigned int i = 0; i < result.size(); i++)
  {
      cout << "Found at index: " << result[i + 1] << endl;
  }
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why not just return std::vector instead of passing it by reference? –  Slava Feb 28 '13 at 0:09
    
Good point, old habits from my pure C programming days I suppose, let me adjust. –  Shafik Yaghmour Feb 28 '13 at 2:09

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