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I wrote the following pieces of code:

for (int i = 0; i < rounds; i++){
        result = rotate(result);
        res[i] = result; 
    }        
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(res[1]));

However, even though i monitor the output from the rotate, i still get this output:

[87, 56, 119, 111, 111, 114, 100, 33, 49, 50, 51]
[56, 119, 111, 111, 114, 100, 33, 49, 50, 51, 87]
[119, 111, 111, 114, 100, 33, 49, 50, 51, 87, 56]
[111, 111, 114, 100, 33, 49, 50, 51, 87, 56, 119]
[111, 114, 100, 33, 49, 50, 51, 87, 56, 119, 111]
[114, 100, 33, 49, 50, 51, 87, 56, 119, 111, 111]
[100, 33, 49, 50, 51, 87, 56, 119, 111, 111, 114]
[33, 49, 50, 51, 87, 56, 119, 111, 111, 114, 100]
[33, 49, 50, 51, 87, 56, 119, 111, 111, 114, 100]

The first one is unrotated; the 2nd one rotated etc etc. You can see the shifting of the numbers. This new array of numbers isn't saved in my array res though for some reason. The last output should in this case be the same as the 2nd output, but its always the one before the last(starting with 33) for some reason. I cant see my mistake, please help me.

edit: I am sorry. here is the code to rotate():

public static byte[] rotate(byte[] a) {
//store initial array in a temporary variable
int Array = a[0];
int i;
for (i = 0; i < a.length - 1; i++) {
    // Move each item up one spot
    a[i] = a[i + 1]; 
}

// At the end of the array, put what was stored.
a[a.length -1] = (byte) Array;
System.out.println(Arrays.toString(a));

// You can't print the array itself, you print its elements
//System.out.println(a);
return (a);

I did not think it would be necessary, since the output from the rotate() is correct. It only doesn't get placed in the array for some reason. (Hence the two dimensional array, array in array).

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closed as not a real question by Mitch Wheat, nfechner, nwinkler, Hanlet Escaño, Troy Alford Feb 28 '13 at 17:56

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Please clarify your intent. You are iterating over a 1d array and asking why it's not 2d. –  Dmitry Feb 28 '13 at 0:06
2  
Welcome to SO! It will help tremendously, if you post a complete program that recreates your issue. It should be enough so that anyone can simply copy-and-paste and then compile it (other than maybe import statements). It should also not contain any code that is irrelevant to your question. If you do this, you will get help much more quickly. –  Code-Apprentice Feb 28 '13 at 0:06
    
rotate() code please –  user1428716 Feb 28 '13 at 0:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Take a look at your implementation of rotate. If it is not allocating a new array for the result, then each of your references in 'res' will point to the same array object.

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Thank you very much! Making a copy of the array to the new array solved it! –  Sicesc Feb 28 '13 at 22:25

I am sorry. here is the code to rotate():

public static byte[] rotate(byte[] a) {
    //store initial array in a temporary variable
    int Array = a[0];
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < a.length - 1; i++) {
        // Move each item up one spot
        a[i] = a[i + 1]; 
    }

    // At the end of the array, put what was stored.
    a[a.length -1] = (byte) Array;
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(a));

    // You can't print the array itself, you print its elements
    //System.out.println(a);
    return (a);

I did not think it would be necessary, since the output from the rotate() is correct. It only doesn't get placed in the array for some reason. (Hence the two dimensional array, array in array).

share|improve this answer

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