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Let's say I have the following scala code:

case class Term(c:Char) {
   def unary_+ = Plus(this)
}

case class Plus(t:Term)

object Term {
  implicit def fromChar(c:Char) = Term(c) 
}

Now I get this from the scala console:

scala> val p = +'a'
p: Int = 97

scala> val q:Plus = +'a'
<console>:16: error: type mismatch;
found   : Int
required: Plus
   val q:Plus = +'a'
                ^

Because '+' is already present on the Char type, the implicit conversion does not take place, I think. Is there a way to override the default behaviour and apply '+' on the converted Term before applying on the Char type?

(BTW, the example is artificial and I'm not looking for alternative designs. The example is just here to illustrate the problem)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, there is no way to override the default + operator, not even with an implicit conversion. When it encounters an operator (actually a method, as operators are just plain methods) that is not defined on the receiving object, the compiler will look for an implicit conversion to an object to does provide this operator. But if the operator is already defined on the target object, it will never look up for any conversion, the original operator will always be called. You should thus define a separate operator whose name will not conflict with any preexisting operator.

UPDATE: The precise rules that govern implicit conversions are defined in the Scala Language Specification:

Views are applied in three situations.

  1. If an expression e is of type T , and T does not conform to the expression’s expected type pt. In this case an implicit v is searched which is applicable to e and whose result type conforms to pt. The search proceeds as in the case of implicit parameters, where the implicit scope is the one of T => pt. If such a view is found, the expression e is converted to v(e).
  2. In a selection e.m with e of type T , if the selector m does not denote a member of T . In this case, a view v is searched which is applicable to e and whose result contains a member named m. The search proceeds as in the case of implicit parameters, where the implicit scope is the one of T . If such a view is found, the selection e.m is converted to v(e).m.
  3. In a selection e.m(args) with e of type T , if the selector m denotes some member(s) of T , but none of these members is applicable to the arguments args. In this case a view v is searched which is applicable to e and whose result contains a method m which is applicable to args. The search proceeds as in the case of implicit parameters, where the implicit scope is the one of T . If such a view is found, the selection e.m is converted to v(e).m(args).

In other words, an implicit conversion occurs in 3 situations:

  1. when an expression is of type T but is used in a context where the unrelated type T' is expected, an implicit conversion from T to T' (if any such conversion is in scope) is applied.

  2. when trying to access an object's member that does not exists on said object, an implicit conversion from the object into another object that does have this member (if any such conversion is in scope) is applied.

  3. when trying to call a method of an object's with a parameter list that does not match any of the corresponding overloads, the compiler applies an implicit conversion from the object into another object that does have a method of this name and with a compatible parameter list (if any such conversion is in scope).

    Note for completeness that this actually applies to more than just methods (inner objects/vals with an apply method are eligible too). Note also that this is the case that Randall Schulz was talking about in his comment below.

So in your case, points (2) and (3) are relevant. Given that you want to define a method named unary_+, which already exists for type Int, case (2) won't kick in. And given that your version has the same parameter list as the built-in Int.unary_+ method (they are both parameterless), point (3) won't kick in either. So you definitly cannot define an implicit that will redefine unary_+.

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1  
To pull out a key fact about implicit conversions from your explanation: Implicit conversions are driven by the failure of an expression to type check as written. Only when that is the case does the compiler start to search for implicit conversions that, when applied, make the expression type check. –  Randall Schulz Feb 28 '13 at 1:49
    
Good summary (and thanks for reminding me to mention type checking, I've updated the answer), but you make it look like it's only about type checking, while in reality member selection comes into play. By which I mean that whether the member (here +) exists or not is crucial. If the member does not exist at all, type checking will hardly come into play. Except if you think about it in terms of structural typing, which indeed does encompass the mere presense/absence of a member, but this is not the simplest way of seeing it, and is above all not how it is defined in the spec (see SLS 7.3). –  Régis Jean-Gilles Feb 28 '13 at 8:52
    
Finding a specific method to invoke is a part of type checking. When I write (1).-++-(2) the compiler looks in the (illusory) Int class for the operator / method -++- and if it cannot find it, that is a type-checking failure, the same as if I tried to invok florp on a String instance. When that type-checking failure occurs, the compiler begins to search for an implicit conversion that takes an Int and produces a type with def -++-(i: Int). –  Randall Schulz Feb 28 '13 at 15:14
    
I must say that you make a good point. In any case, your comment prompted me to update my post with the specific rules of implicit resolutions, which was a good thing as it removed any ambiguity ("failure to typecheck" still feels like a fuzzy definition to me). –  Régis Jean-Gilles Feb 28 '13 at 15:54
    
I admit "failure to type-check" is a catch-all... –  Randall Schulz Feb 28 '13 at 15:57

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