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I found this example interview question and would like some help understanding it:

#include <iostream>

class A
{
public:
    A(int n = 0)
        : m_n(n)
    {
        ++m_ctor1_calls;
    }

    A(const A& a)
        : m_n(a.m_n)
    {
        ++m_copy_ctor_calls;
    }

public:
    static int m_ctor1_calls;
    static int m_copy_ctor_calls;

private:
    int m_n;
};

int A::m_ctor1_calls = 0;
int A::m_copy_ctor_calls = 0;

void f(const A &a1, const A &a2 = A())
{
}

int main()
{
    A a(2), b = 5;
    const A c(a), &d = c, e = b;
    std::cout << A::m_ctor1_calls << A::m_copy_ctor_calls;
    b = d;
    A *p = new A(c), *q = &a;
    std::cout << A::m_copy_ctor_calls;
    delete p;
    f(3);
    std::cout << A::m_ctor1_calls << A::m_copy_ctor_calls << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

The way I understand it, the first line of main creates two new objects, resulting in 2 calls to the constructor. In the second line, I see that they use the copy constructor for c(a) and e = b. The copy constructor isn't used for &d = c because it is only referencing c is that right? Also one thing I don't understand is that if the copy constructor requires a reference, how come an object is being passed into it instead of a reference to the object? The parts after with pointers are really confusing to me. Can someone provide some insight?

Thanks!

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copy constructor calls can be and often are elided (that is, optimized away) –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Feb 28 '13 at 0:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The copy constructor isn't used for &d = c because it is only referencing c is that right?

Yes. d becomes an alias for c.

Also one thing I don't understand is that if the copy constructor requires a reference, how come an object is being passed into it instead of a reference to the object?

An object passed into a function taking a reference is automatically "converted" into a reference. The parameter is now an alias for the passed-in object.

The parts after with pointers are really confusing to me. Can someone provide some insight?

p points to a newly allocated A object, copied from c. q points to a. (1 copy constructor). Then p is deleted.

f(3) gets fun. It constructs a temporary A initialized with 3 to bind to a1. a2 gets a temporary default constructed A. After f(3) finishes, these two temporaries are destroyed.

End of the function, and the remaining instances of A are destroyed.

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Thanks for the great explanation. –  user2062706 Feb 28 '13 at 2:51

Outside of an interview, you can stick this code in an IDE and step through it with a debugger.

In case you were wondering, here is the output (with spaces added): 2 2 3 4 3

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Thanks for the suggestion. I had done so but still had questions leading to the post. –  user2062706 Feb 28 '13 at 1:19

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