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(define (square-list items)
  (define (iter things answer)
    (if (null? things)
        answer
        (iter (cdr things)
              (cons (square (car things))
                    answer))))
  (iter items nil))

When I enter

(square-list (list 1 2 3 4))

it returns (16 9 4 1) - why is this backwards?

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're constructing the output list using tail-recursion, and for that, you're accumulating in answer by appending at the head of the list. Naturally, that'll produce a list in reverse. You have a couple options for fixing this, one is ditching the tail recursion:

(define (square-list items)
  (if (null? items)
      nil
      (cons (square (car items))
            (square-list (cdr items)))))

Other, reversing the list before processing it:

(define (square-list items)
  (define (iter things answer)
    (if (null? things)
        answer
        (iter (cdr things)
              (cons (square (car things))
                    answer))))
  (iter (reverse items) nil))

Yet another option: appending the elements at the end, instead of consing them:

(define (square-list items)
  (define (iter things answer)
    (if (null? things)
        answer
        (iter (cdr things)
              (append answer
                      (list (square (car things)))))))
  (iter items nil))

Each option has its own trade-offs, though:

  • The first option is not tail-recursive (although it is tail-recursive modulo cons)
  • The second option requires one extra traversal and one extra list (this happens when the list is reversed)
  • The third option is quadratic, because each append operation traverses the list for adding the element at the end

All things considered, the best tail-recursive option would be the second one.

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Look at the simple case of two elements:

(square-list '(2 3))

This results in:

(iter '(3)
      (cons (square 2) nil))

==

(iter '(3) '(4))

The recursive call then does:

(iter '()
      (cons (square 3) '(4))

==

(iter '() '(9 4))

This will then invoke the base case of iter, which just returns answer.

So it's stepping through the list in the forward direction, but as each element is processed the square is put on the front of the answer list, so the result is built backwards.

The simple fix is to change (cons (square (car things)) answer) to:

(append answer (list (square (car things))))

This puts the new result at the end instead of the beginning. However, this is generally considered a poor approach, because it has to rebuild the result list each time, copying O(n) elements.

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The problem is your cons statement. If you switch the order from:

(cons (square (car things)) answer)

To:

(cons answer (square (car things)))

Your list will come out in the order your want.

I always find it a lot easier to write like this:

(define (square-list2 items)
  (square-list-helper items '())
)

(define (square-list-helper items squares)
  (cond
    [(empty? items) squares]
    [else (append 
             squares 
             (square-list-helper (cdr items) (list (square (car items)))))]
    )
 )
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3  
Not really, because answer is a list. You need to append rather than cons if you do this. – Barmar Feb 28 '13 at 1:21
    
@Barmar I receive an error message on append as you are suggesting I use it. – Hunter McMillen Feb 28 '13 at 1:34
    
I didn't intend that you simply change cons to append, I meant that you need to use append properly (by wrapping the new element in a list). – Barmar Feb 28 '13 at 1:36
    
consing an element at the end of a list (as suggested at the beginning) will not create a proper list, for example: (cons '(1 2) 3) => '((1 2) . 3) – Óscar López Feb 28 '13 at 1:37
    
@Barmar Ah, I see what you mean. If you note, that is what I did in my second solution. – Hunter McMillen Feb 28 '13 at 1:40

you are cons-ing in the wrong order: first the recursively processed rest of the list and then the result of processing the current element. That will reverse your list at the same time it processes it. Try this instead:

(define (square-list items)
  (define (iter things answer)
    (if (null? things)
      answer
      (iter (cdr things)
            (append answer (list (square (car things)))))))
(iter items (list)))
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