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I'm evaluating the rAppid.js framework as a candidate for a new project. The project will be a web app aimed primarily at mobile devices (I will be using web views to wrap it as an app that can be submitted to the Apple and Android App Stores). I realize that's not the primary use case that rAppid.js was built for but I think it could potentially work well, at least in my case, thanks to rAppid.js's XML-based UI language.

Could I, in theory, use the new rAppid.js server to render templates there and send the rendered HTML to the client?

Given that I want the pages to load as quickly as possible, and the app doesn't need to work offline, I'd prefer to render the templates on the server side and send them to the client as plain HTML. Obviously the framework could only provide me with one-way data-binding in this case (unless I reworked the rAppid.js code to support a server-rendering model similarly to the Derby framework) but I think the performance improvement for the app could be worth it.

Maybe I'm being overly pessimistic about rAppidJS's client-side rendering speed on mobile devices but in any case I'd be curious to hear opinions on this.

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Could I, in theory, use the new rAppid.js server to render templates there and send the rendered HTML to the client?

Yes, with the node rendering feature. But please keep in mind, that node-rendering was developed for SEO reasons. Because of this background the only state of the application is the url. This could fit into you application concept (e.g. /user/{userid}/news) to render the news of the user, but the rendered site will be completely static.

So if you relay on user inputs, client side validation, you should use rAppid:js the way it was designed, and render the complete application on the client.

Given that I want the pages to load as quickly as possible, and the app doesn't need to work offline, I'd prefer to render the templates on the server side and send them to the client as plain HTML. Obviously the framework could only provide me with one-way data-binding in this case (unless I reworked the rAppid.js code to support a server-rendering model similarly to the Derby framework) but I think the performance improvement for the app could be worth it.

My experience from RIA is that the have an initial loading phase (Flex applications showing a loader, iOS native applications shows a image until the app is ready) and the the app works quickly without additional load times. If you separate the application into modules (rAppid.js supports this very well) and just load the module during start that is needed the app should load really fast. If you wrap the app within a web view, the JS performance is slightly better than running it within the mobile browser.

You can also try a combination of server and client side rendering, but without mixim them up. So render the page on the server and show the static html during the loading phase of the application. As long as the application is completely loaded switch the views.

Maybe I'm being overly pessimistic about rAppidJS's client-side rendering speed on mobile devices but in any case I'd be curious to hear opinions on this.

In our latest project we also added a preloader and separated the project into modules. In comparison to the flash version we also have it is 10 times smaller and loads faster in desktop systems. On mobile it doesn't load because of the flash plugin, so I cannot compare it.

If you want a great performance on the mobile devices, split the application into several modules and load them only if the are needed.

rAppid:js supports module loading based on routes, so it is also possible to start the application with a preselected module.

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Thank you for the thorough answer; that definitely changes my perspective. The idea of showing static HTML during page rendering is very clever! That could be accomplished with the server-side node rendering feature, right? About the web view vs. mobile browser...would the web view would be faster because the Javascript would already be on the phone rather than needing to be downloaded, or for some other reason? –  Matt Browne Mar 1 '13 at 20:04

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