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I have three models:

class Rate < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :user_id, :car_id, :rate

  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :car
end

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :name

  has_many :rates
  accepts_nested_attributes_for :rates
end

class Car < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :name

  has_many :rates
  accepts_nested_attributes_for :rates
end

And one controller:

class UsersController < ResourceController
  def new
    # Assume user is loaded
    @user.rates.build
  end
end

I'm trying to build a nested form that will associate a list of users/cars and their associated rates.

Something like:

<% form_for @user do |f| %>
  <%= @user.name %><br />
  <% Car.all.each do |car| %>
    <%= car.name %><br />
    <%= f.fields_for :rates do |r| %>
      <%= r.number_field :rate %>
    <% end %>
  <% end %>
<% end %>

The problem is that I would like the Rate model to store data as follows:

USER_ID    CAR_ID    RATE
1          1         10
1          2         20
1          3         30
2          1         40
3          2         50

I cannot figure out how to properly build the fields_for helper to build the proper params for both the user_id and the car_id.

Something like:

user[car=1][rate]
user[car=2][rate]

I've tried being more explicit with the fields_for like this:

<%= r.fields_for 'user[car][rate]' %>

But it still doesn't build out the nested parameters properly. The car parameter is not correctly identified.

Any help would be appreciated! Thanks.

EDIT: The controller action has to be under user. The example above has been shortened for brevity but other user-related attributes are available through the form so it has to use the users controller.

ANSWER: I figured out a way to do it. I've added my own answer that explains it.

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3 Answers 3

<% form_for @user do |f| %>
  <%= @user.name %><br />
   <%= f.fields_for :rates do |r| %>
      <% Car.all.each do |car| %>
      <%= car.name %><br />
      <%= r.number_field :rate %>
    <% end %>
  <% end %>
<% end %>

This may be solution of your problem. Just check it.

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Not quite the answer, but it pointed my a new direction that eventually led to it. I'll vote you up for usefulness! Thanks. –  d_ethier Feb 28 '13 at 19:27
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The form is going to create a new rate instead of a new user, so the method should be in RatesController instead of UsersController.

With this logic the problem seems solved. You can write field_for rate[user] and field_for rate[car]

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I should have added this to the original question. The form shares other attributes for the user, not just rates. I shortened it for brevity. It has to be under the users controller. I'll update the original question. –  d_ethier Feb 28 '13 at 3:17
    
Without going to details, my first impression is it's not logical to mix updating user attributes and adding rate. One form takes too much concerns. Different actions are better in different forms, adding rate is adding rate, updating profile is update profile. –  Billy Chan Feb 28 '13 at 3:25
    
It's possible. I've added my own answer as to how I solved it. –  d_ethier Feb 28 '13 at 19:27
    
I still don't quite understand the business logic behind it. Anyway it's good you find your own solution. –  Billy Chan Mar 1 '13 at 1:47
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I think I've got it figured out.

In my controller, I've modified the build method as follows:

Car.all.each { |c| @user.rates.build(car_id: c.id) } if @user.rates.count == 0

Then, in my model, I need the following:

attr_accessible :rates_attributes

Finally, the fields_for block should look like this (remember, this is in the @user form object f):

<%= f.fields_for :rates do |r| %>
  <%= r.hidden_field :car_id %>
  <%= r.object.car.name %><br />
  <%= r.number_field :rate %>
<% end %>

This builds the params hash properly and create the rate model entries when the form is submitted.

The check on existing user rates in the controller will ensure that the existing values are used in the form and new ones are not built (which I thought build took into consideration... ?).

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