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This is a contrived example to keep the data generation easy, but in general this should be a problem applicable to a wide audience.

I have a time-series of measurements like so:

In [1]: import pandas as pd

In [2]: index = pd.date_range(start="18:10",periods=20,freq='min')

In [3]: df = pd.DataFrame(randn(20,3),columns=list('abc'),index=index)

In [4]: df.head()
Out[4]: 
                            a         b         c
2013-02-27 18:10:00 -1.344753  0.438351  1.561849
2013-02-27 18:11:00  1.715643  1.601984 -0.027408
2013-02-27 18:12:00 -0.142264 -0.049462  0.482493
2013-02-27 18:13:00  0.132617  0.737902 -0.347620
2013-02-27 18:14:00  1.277257  0.083401  0.649422

In between the 'real' measurements, calibration measurements are being done, but at a much lesser frequency than the measurements, e.g. something like this:

In [5]: calindex = pd.date_range("18:12:30",periods=4,freq='5min')

In [6]: caldata = pd.Series([10,20,30,40],index = calindex)

In [7]: caldata
Out[7]: 
2013-02-27 18:12:30    10
2013-02-27 18:17:30    20
2013-02-27 18:22:30    30
2013-02-27 18:27:30    40
Freq: 5T

The general idea now is to apply these calibration data to the measurements. For this, I would like to distribute / broadcast the calibration data by a 'closest-time' approach, so I would like to generate another column called 'offsets' for example, that has that calibration value in each row of the measurements that was determined closest in time to the time of each measurement value.

Therefore I am after an end result like this:

In [14]: df
Out[14]: 
                            a         b         c  offsets
2013-02-27 18:10:00 -1.344753  0.438351  1.561849       10
2013-02-27 18:11:00  1.715643  1.601984 -0.027408       10
2013-02-27 18:12:00 -0.142264 -0.049462  0.482493       10
2013-02-27 18:13:00  0.132617  0.737902 -0.347620       10
2013-02-27 18:14:00  1.277257  0.083401  0.649422       10
2013-02-27 18:15:00  0.048120  0.421220  0.149372       20
2013-02-27 18:16:00  0.812317 -1.517389  2.035487       20
2013-02-27 18:17:00 -0.058959 -0.034876 -1.535118       20
2013-02-27 18:18:00 -0.666227  0.040208 -1.042464       20
2013-02-27 18:19:00 -0.077031 -0.158351 -0.441992       20
2013-02-27 18:20:00  0.103083 -0.129341  0.294073       30
2013-02-27 18:21:00  0.900802  0.443271 -0.946229       30
2013-02-27 18:22:00  0.744631 -0.058666 -0.386226       30
2013-02-27 18:23:00 -0.064313  0.500321 -0.536237       30
2013-02-27 18:24:00 -0.392653  0.789827  0.000109       30
2013-02-27 18:25:00  1.926765  0.252259 -0.051475       40
2013-02-27 18:26:00 -0.035577  0.559222 -0.290751       40
2013-02-27 18:27:00  1.726165  0.626515 -0.868177       40
2013-02-27 18:28:00  1.269409  1.520980 -0.181637       40
2013-02-27 18:29:00 -1.151166 -0.300196  0.420747       40

The application of values into other columns via .map, .apply, etc. I believe to understand well, it is the apparently required time or offset trickery one needs to do for the distribution of the values that I don't have a clue what to start with.

Should it maybe be attacked with pandas.DateOffsets? Is there machinery to minimize time-deltas inside pandas somewhere?

I would appreciate a nudge into the right direction, doesn't have to be complete at all, just the direction where I need to be going.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I use numpy functions to calculate the nearest time location:

from numpy.random import randn
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

index = pd.date_range(start="18:10",periods=20,freq='min')
df = pd.DataFrame(randn(20,3),columns=list('abc'),index=index)
calindex = pd.date_range("18:12:30",periods=4,freq='5min')
caldata = pd.Series([10,20,30,40],index = calindex)

# if you use numpy 1.7
real_time = df.index.values
cali_time = caldata.index.values

# if you use numpy 1.6
real_time = np.array(df.index.values.view("i8") / 1000, dtype="datetime64[us]")
cali_time = np.array(caldata.index.values.view("i8") / 1000, dtype="datetime64[us]")

right_index = cali_time.searchsorted(real_time, side="left")
left_index = np.clip(right_index - 1, 0, len(caldata)-1)
right_index = np.clip(right_index, 0, len(caldata)-1)
left_time = cali_time[left_index]
right_time = cali_time[right_index]
left_diff = np.abs(left_time - real_time)
right_diff = np.abs(right_time - real_time)
caldata2 = caldata[np.where(left_diff < right_diff, left_time, right_time)]
df["offset"] = caldata2.values
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! But: 'l' and 'r' are undefined? –  K.-Michael Aye Feb 28 '13 at 6:40
    
I edited the source code, I think it's ok this time. –  HYRY Feb 28 '13 at 7:03
    
i tried to use it but receive errors: left_diff and right_diff are not displayable in an ipython console, i get the error "TypeError: don't know how to convert scalar number to int). And the np.where breaks with the error "TypeError: ufunc 'less' not supported for the input types, and the inputs could not be safely coercedto any supported types according to the casting rule 'safe'" –  K.-Michael Aye Feb 28 '13 at 7:07
    
actually, cali_time is an np.array, while df.index is a pandas.DatetimeIndex, can this be the problem? –  K.-Michael Aye Feb 28 '13 at 7:08
    
I tried the left_diff/right_diff calculation with using df.index.values instead, but because of numpy's inability to treat the timedelta64 type correctly, things are totally messed up. The np.where() gives 45129 as year! –  K.-Michael Aye Feb 28 '13 at 7:13

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