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Is there any reason why one shouldn't #include another file from within a class declaration when that class defines numerous private constants?

I'm writing a class which adheres to a simple state-transition system and defines a processing schedule consisting of several states, each of which consist of a series of steps. Because the class has to refer to these states and steps in various functions (for example, when determining which processing to apply based on the current state and step), I end up defining a bunch of private enum's within the class's declaration to make the implementation readable (so I can refer to things like kStates_ModeTransition and kStateSteps_ModeTransition_PrepareNewSetup etc, rather than just using the raw integer values associated with these states and steps).

As the list of states and state-steps has grown longer, this collection of enum's has become a fairly long, awkward chunk of code in the middle of the class declaration, and I feel these constants are more connected to the implementation than the interface - a user of the class doesn't necessarily have to know about them. Is there any reason why I shouldn't move all of these enum's to another file and then just #include that file into the private section of the class declaration? I haven't encountered another situation where it seemed appropriate to use a #include within the body of a class, so I'm wondering if there's a better way to handle this or any particular reason such an #include would be bad form. Furthermore, is there any sensible standard file extension to use on such a file, used only for text insertion (it isn't really a header...)? Just .txt?

Thanks!

Edit: A bit more to see if one of the mentioned alternatives completely dissolves my dilemma:

Trying to stick only to the essentials, here's an example of my current structure

// Processor.h

class Processor
{
public:

    Processor();
    void Process( float* input, float* output, int numSamples );

private:

    // List of possible states
    enum
    {
        kStates_Default,
        kStates_SettingChangeImmediate,
        kStates_SettingChangeCrossfade,
        kStates_SpecialProcessing,
        kStates_NumStates
    };

    // Lists of steps for each state...
    enum
    {
        kStateSteps_Default_PrepareInput,
        kStateSteps_Default_CalculateIntermediateValues,
        kStateSteps_Default_CalculateOutput,
        kStateSteps_Default_NumSteps
    };


    // Imagine more lists for other states here, with comments...

    // Becoming quite long...


    // Private functions used in implementing various processing steps 
    //      (some are used by multiple state-steps in varying ways)
    void PrivateFunction1();
    void PrivateFunction2();


    // Some member variables here
};

This is used in a real-time processing context in order to better balance DSP load when performing block-processing tasks. In reality, this class inherits from a base class which handles the actual scheduling of calls to Process, updating the current state and state-step as needed. Process() then consists of a switch statement which performs certain processing functions and IO based on the current state and state-step of the object.

The values declared in the enums are used within Process() and other private member functions inside processor.cpp, and nowhere else. I've declared them as private member variables to scope them to within the class. Is there a way to declare them inside the .cpp and achieve the same scoping? These are all meant to be constant integers optimized away at compile time and are essentially being used as #define 's - I just don't want to use macros.

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You are not really hiding your implementation details, you just moving them into a separate public header. Any change to the implementation will still require recompilation of the client code. Consider moving the implementation into a separate source file, using Pimpl or any other technique. –  n.m. Feb 28 '13 at 4:31

4 Answers 4

All includes are just text inclusion. Since the file you're including contains C++ syntax, it should have a C++ header extension (.h or .hpp or etc.).

You may not need to include it into the declaration (I could speak to this more certainly if you post some code) ... you could just include it into the implementation files, and declare any enum member variables as int ... using typedefs (aliases for int) if you want to give them descriptive type names. Or if you're using C++11, you can forward declare your enum types without defining them, and then you enum member variables will be typesafe, preventing assignment of the wrong sort of enum value.

As for your question of whether there's a reason why you shouldn't move the enums out of your class declaration into another file and include that file: one can always invent reasons not to do things, such as "our Coding Standards say never to include a file other than at top level, at the top of the file", but if such arbitrary reasons don't apply to you then no, there's no reason. Do what makes the most sense in terms of code maintainability.

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Using an #include in the middle of a class is highly irregular and could cause problems. It's much better if you declare your constants in either their own namespace or class.

For instance, this is a bad idea:

class Foo
{
   #include "foostuff.h"
};

The more typical pattern is:

#include "foostuff.h"

class Foo
{
   void bar(int x = FooStuff::const_x);
};

Inside foostuff.h you'd be careful to namespace things so they won't collide with other parts of your application.

The C++ way of doing things encourages the re-use of constants between different parts of your application instead of using #define to create macros that, once expanded, have no particular association.

All "include" files should be either .h for plain C or .hpp for anything that requires a C++ capable compiler to interpret. Anything else is non-standard and will, at the very least, lead to scorn from anyone who has to maintain your code.

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New C++11 enum class may be forward declared and real definition moved to implementation. That will clean the mess and reduce annoyance.

// Procesor.hpp
class Processor
{
public:

    Processor();
    void Process( float* input, float* output, int numSamples );

private:

    // Type of possible states
    enum class kState;
    kState somethingDealingWithState( kState s ); 
};

// Processor.cpp
// List of possible states
enum class Processor::kState
{
    Default,
    SettingChangeImmediate,
    SettingChangeCrossfade,
    SpecialProcessing,
    NumStates
};

Processor::kState Processor::somethingDealingWithState( kState s )
{
    if ( s == kState::Default )
    {
        return kState::SpecialProcessing;
    }
    return kState::Default;
} 
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like it's pretty much what I need but I have a few questions for you about it: –  thamoonisdown Feb 28 '13 at 6:17
    
What questions? I may likely know the answers. There were some typos in my code. –  Öö Tiib Feb 28 '13 at 6:35
    
Sorry! That posted prematurely - still new to the site. This is pretty much what I've been looking for. I originally leaned away from declaring the enums within a namespace or class scope in the .cpp file (which was an option because I have been using anonymous enum's and not using them for typechecking) because I was hoping to fully encapsulate the enums in the class, and this method enables that without all the mess, like you've said. I do wish there was a way to avoid the scoping syntax, but I suppose I've basically been using it anyway through the name prefixes. Thanks! –  thamoonisdown Feb 28 '13 at 6:44
    
The questions would have been about comparing this method to declaring the enums within a scope (struct, namespace, or class) in the .cpp, but searching around provided me with good answers :). –  thamoonisdown Feb 28 '13 at 6:46

In the end, it seems the best way to achieve equivalent functionality while gaining the benefit of separating the enumeration details into the .cpp implementation file is to use a forward declaration of a struct within the private portion of the class, and to then define that struct to contain the desired enum's from within the .cpp file.

// Processor.h

class Processor
{
public:

    Processor();
    void Process( float* input, float* output, int numSamples );

private:

    struct States;     // Used to scope State enum to within class
    struct StateSteps; // Used to scope StateStep enums to within class

    // Other stuff...
}

// Processor.cpp

struct Processor::States
{
    enum
    {
        Default,
        SettingChangeImmediate,
        SettingChangeCrossfade,
        SpecialProcessing,
        NumStates
    };
}

struct Processor::StateSteps
{
    enum
    {
        Default_PrepareInput,
        Default_CalculateIntermediateValues,
        Default_CalculateOutput,
        Default_NumSteps
    };

    enum 
    {
        SettingChangeImmediate_FirstStep,
        // ... other state-steps...
    };
};

Here's why I think this structure is best in this particular use-case:

  1. All enum listings are moved to the .cpp file, out of the middle of the header as desired, and additional StateStep enums which contain the same values (say, counting up from 0) may be added into the definition of the StateSteps struct without disturbing the .h header (while we could add entries to a forward-declared enum class, we couldn't have repeats of the same value and would need to add another enum class to the header).

  2. All of the enums are scoped within the private portion of the class as before (albeit within another struct as well).

  3. Enums which are being used to define compile-time integer constants may remain anonymous and not strongly typed enum class constructs, which may mislead others as to how the enums are being used (in the current use-case, we WANT to be able to compare different stateStep enum values to the same integer currentStep, depending on the current state, as we could with the originally defined anonymous enums).

Previous answers helped get me to this conclusion, but I feel that this is a way which most closely duplicates the functionality of the original definitions while moving them out of the .h file!

share|improve this answer
    
I suppose the downside to this method is that you have to declare private structs in the class just to wrap the enums, which might be misleading and isn't totally ideal. Maybe one struct named enums could be declared (struct privateEnums; or equivalent) instead, although it would lead to even longer names. –  thamoonisdown Mar 1 '13 at 0:47

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