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How do you use perl regular expression to convert the following text:

1100101
1100111
1110001
1110101

into

1 1 0 0 1 0 1
1 1 0 0 1 1 1
1 1 1 0 0 0 1
1 1 1 0 1 0 1

I tried using

perl -pe 's// /g' < text.txt

but it gave me some funny results like this:

 1 1 0 0 1 0 1
  1 1 0 0 1 1 1
  1 1 1 0 0 0 1
  1 1 1 0 1 0 1
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6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted
perl -pe 's/(?<=[^\n])([^\n])/ \1/g'
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Why use regular expressions at all?

perl -pe '$_ = join " ", split ""'
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Using look-ahead:

perl -pe 's/(\d)(?=.)/$1 /g'

Using look-ahead and look-behind:

perl -pe 's/(?<=\d)(?=.)/ /g'
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+1 - Or even just s/(?<=.)(?=.)/ /g –  Kenosis Feb 28 '13 at 5:25

One more way using auto-split:

 perl -F// -ane 'print "@F";' file
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Or like this ...

$ perl -pe 's/(?<!^)(\d)/ \1/g' input
1 1 0 0 1 0 1
1 1 0 0 1 1 1
1 1 1 0 0 0 1
1 1 1 0 1 0 1

... there is a nice explanation of negative regex here: negative regex for perl string pattern match

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you are almost there:

perl -pe 's/(.)/$1 /g' your_file

tested below:

> cat temp
1100101
1100111
1110001
1110101
> perl -pe 's/(.)/$1 /g' temp
1 1 0 0 1 0 1 
1 1 0 0 1 1 1 
1 1 1 0 0 0 1 
1 1 1 0 1 0 1 
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2  
This adds a space to the end of each line. –  Kenosis Feb 28 '13 at 6:33

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