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Consider the following example,

Example: 1:1 Hello.

Now i would like to have ("1:1") and ("Hello") in two separate string variables.Any solution is greatly appreciated..

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closed as too localized by Anthony Pegram, sgarizvi, Druid, Steven Penny, Yan Sklyarenko Feb 28 '13 at 7:41

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To get exactly 2 strings out of a string that contains at least one but potentially having more spaces, you can use this String.Split(Char[], Int32) overload in which you can specify the maximum number of splits (substrings) needed.

Example usages:

"1:1 Hello".Split(new char[] {' '}, 2) this will give you two strings 1:1 and Hello

"1:1 Hello world".Split(new char[] {' '}, 2) will give you two strings 1:1 and Hello world

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This will give at MOST 2 strings, not EXACTLY 2 strings. If the input was "1:1" the output will only be 1:1 with no second string. –  DocMax Feb 28 '13 at 6:10
    
@DocMax true, but that's the case with all Split overloads, we assume the requirement is at least two words, answering the specific question here –  user1416420 Feb 28 '13 at 6:11
    
I just want to be cautious because the OP doesn't specify what kinds of input he will be using and because your use of the phrase "no matter what" may mislead someone who is unfamiliar with this overload. –  DocMax Feb 28 '13 at 6:24
    
@DocMax edited. The main point which I wanted to emphasize (but failed I guess since I didn't put it in the answer body initially) is that it looks like the OP may run into more problems if he uses the most popular Split overload if the input contains more spaces which is 50/50 chance I'd guess. The problems which may arise from this overload are the same as the popular overload but if he has more spaces he'll have less problems if he uses this overload. –  user1416420 Feb 28 '13 at 6:38
    
I want to store 1.1 in one column and hello in another in database. –  TinKerBell Feb 28 '13 at 6:46

Use String.Split with the space character.

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You can use .Split to separate base on the empty space.

var str = "1:1 Hello";
var s = str.Split(' ');
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I have appended space to str1 to avoid exceptions if string (str) doesn't contain space. If there are no chances of having strings without spaces, remove the additional space in str1.

var str = "1:1 Hello";
var str1 = (str+" ").Split(' ');
var firststr = str1[0];
var hellostr = str1[1];
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this will split in to three item –  spajce Feb 28 '13 at 5:14
    
yes, right. But I am taking only first two items, third item is safe side for exception cases. OP asked in two different variables, so it works for variables not having spaces too. –  Sunny Feb 28 '13 at 5:20
    
There is no exception if the string doesn't contain a white space. The result will contain only str[0] with the whole string. There is no need to add an extra empty space. –  alexandrudicu Feb 28 '13 at 5:21
    
@alexandrudicu, There will be array index out of bounds exception if string doesnt contain space and try to access str[1] –  Sunny Feb 28 '13 at 5:22
    
if my sentence is 1.1 hello kitty then 1.1 in one variable and hello kitty in another variable to be store. Am first time working in C# plz help me :( –  TinKerBell Feb 28 '13 at 6:50

If Split() is not enough, you may consider regular expression.

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Care to give an example of how you would split the text with a regular expression? –  Makoto Feb 28 '13 at 6:09

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