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I have defined some structure above main as:

struct arguments
{
   int c;
   char *v[];
};

now I want to do this in main:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    arguments arg;

    arg.c = argc;
    arg.v = argv; /* error: incompatible types in assignment of 'char** to char* [0]' */
}

So, I do not fully understand what I am doing, but instinctively I remade the structure such that the line char *v[]; is instead char **v[]; however, this means when I pass by reference my structure arg, if I want to dereference and get the value of arg.v[0], which will be the program name, I now have to do *arg.v[0] and this no longer works for *arg.v[1].

I have a function such as:

void argument_reader(arguments &arg)
{
   cout << "Number of arguments: " << arg.c << endl << endl;
   cout << "Array\t\tValue\n";
   cout_bar(40);
   for (int i = 0; i < arg.c; i++)
   {
      cout << "argv[" << i << "]\t\t" << *arg.v[i] << endl;
   }
   return;
}

but when I call *arg.v[i] the program ends without printing the value of the second argument or any others for that matter.

So my question is, is there some way I can use the struct to pass between functions such that I can call arg.v[some_index < arg.c] inside another function by somehow making the line arg.v = argv in main work as I had intended (to store the address of argv in arg.v)

All the structure does is make it so that instead of having to pass argc and argv to a function which has a decleration like: void func(int &argc, char *argv[]); I can instead pass my new structure type with variable name arg to a function declared like void func(arguments &arg) and that is basically all I wanted the structure for. So if I cannot do this, then I can go back to the first method.

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Once you change char *v[] to char **v it works fine: liveworkspace.org/code/3UHbZZ$0 –  congusbongus Feb 28 '13 at 5:27
    
Note that in a function declaration, char *argv[] and char **argv have the same meaning, and both mean "argv is a pointer to a pointer to a char". –  Mankarse Feb 28 '13 at 6:25
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to write:

struct arguments
{
    int    c;
    char **v;
};

Now your main() will work. (And this sort of confusion is why I always use int main(int argc, char **argv), but that's a personal quirk.)

If you were working in C99 or later, what you created with your structure is what is called a 'flexible array member' (FAM), an addition to C99 over C89 (and therefore over C++98). I didn't notice that you're working in C++! There are special rules about FAM in C, and you can't do the assignment as you did with a flexible array member.

However, the fix will work in C++ just as much as in C; it is just not necessarily correct that you're using an FAM. Are you using a C++ compiler that supports FAM as an extension?

In your output line, you have:

cout << "argv[" << i << "]\t\t" << *arg.v[i] << endl;

That would print the first character of the argument; drop the * and you'd get the first argument as a string:

cout << "argv[" << i << "]\t\t" << arg.v[i] << endl;
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Yes, let me edit my question to be more clear why I do not understand why I cannot then call *arg.v[1] –  Leonardo Feb 28 '13 at 5:23
    
and C++ is not compatible with c99, we still do not have VLAs in C++ –  Aniket Feb 28 '13 at 5:26
    
@Aniket: Yes...interesting; I assumed it was C99 because of the FAM...and FAM does not work in C++, does it? Or is that new in C++2011? –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 28 '13 at 5:28
    
Nope, not yet in C++ afaik - maybe it will be in the future, but for now, its not there. Maybe people will say - why not use std::vector instead of a FAM, but those madmen in C++ standards community may come up with absolutely anything and the kitchen sink –  Aniket Feb 28 '13 at 5:29
    
There is still a problem here, if I pass arg to a function like argument_reader in my question, how do I call *arg.v[i] when I use this in cout I am expecting it to print the full argument, not a single character. –  Leonardo Feb 28 '13 at 5:30
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Change your struct to this:

struct arguments
{
   int c;
   char **v;
};

C-style array and pointer are very similar, and you can use above struct just like your version or the original argv parameter.

Indeed, often main function is declared like that instead of using []:

int main(int argc, char **argv)

Note that with this answer code v points to the original argv array of pointers to char, pointers are not copied. If you actually want a copy, you need to dynamically allocate array of char pointers and copy.

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two things:

struct arguments
{
   int c;
   char *v[]; /*unknown length, hence structure is incomplete*/
};

You need a double pointer, which holds the address of the argv

    struct arguments {
       int c;
       char **v;
    };
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That makes sense, that it does not know the length of the array is probably why I cannot call *arg.v[1], thanks that is a clear answer. –  Leonardo Feb 28 '13 at 5:27
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