Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wonder what is the inner function like? I know that you can write following

var obj = {
       test: 'something'
}

But in this code, the innerfunction does not refer to a variable, but to a function. Is there anyother way to write / call the inner function?

function outer(){

    var a = "Outerfunction";
    console.log(a)

    innerFct: function InnerFct()    {                                              
            var c = "Inner";
            console.log(c)
    }innerFct();
}
window.outer();

thank you

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are a couple of different things going on here.

In this code:

var obj = {
    test: 'something'
}

you are using "literal object notation" to create -- well, an object with one property test and that property has a value of something

In your second case, you are creating a code block (yes, it is fun that both objects and code blocks use the same syntax {...} to define them.

Inside of a code block, the innerFct: becomes a label. Labels are used with some control flow statements to jump around. Forget about them, you really are better off not using them.

function outer(){
    var a = "Outerfunction";
    console.log(a)

    function innerFct()    {                                              
        var c = "Inner";
        console.log(c)
    }
    innerFct();
}
outer();

or even

function outer(){
    var a = "Outerfunction";
    console.log(a)

    var innerFct = function ()    {                                              
        var c = "Inner";
        console.log(c)
    }
    innerFct();
}
outer();
share|improve this answer
    
thank you, that was exactly what I was looking for. Yes I know, that the first one was a literal object, but I wonder why the function works with ":" –  Christoph Ha Feb 28 '13 at 5:49
    
Your original code throws an error: ReferenceError: innerFct is not defined for me. What browser are you using where it works? –  Patrick M Feb 28 '13 at 5:57
    
@ChristophHa -- More info on labels: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/… –  Jeremy J Starcher Feb 28 '13 at 12:02

You are confusing functions with objects.

When using an object, the colon is used to show key-value pairs.

var object = {
  innerFct: function(){
    console.log('rawr');
  },
  someVariable: 7
}

object.innerFct(); //logs rawr
object.someVariable = 4; //just changed from 7 to 4

Using a colon how you have it in your example is incorrect syntax. Also when you are creating a function within an object like that, you don't name the function again because you are already assigning it to a name on the object.

Then you can edit the function anytime by doing something like this:

object.innerFct = function(){
  //new code
}

Doing object.innerFct() will call the function.

share|improve this answer

Other answers have sufficiently covered the object syntax and calling the function in scope. As I mentioned in the comment, you can just do this:

function outer(){
    (function () {
        var c = "inner";
        console.log(c)
    })();
}
window.outer();

And it logs inner just fine.

Edit: Private/hidden variables like innerFct in the original code sample can be captured in closures as well.

outer = function() {
    var innerFct = function () { console.log("inner"); }
    // innerFct is captured in the closure of the following functions
    // so it is defined within the scope of those functions, when they are called
    // even though it isn't defined before or after they complete
    window.wrapper = function() { innerFct(); }
    return function() { innerFct(); }
}
outer();

// each of these next three lines logs "inner"
window.wrapper();   // assigned to global variable
outer()();          // calling the returned function
var innerFctBackFromTheDead = outer(); // saving the returned function
innerFctBackFromTheDead();

There is also the object constructor/prototype syntax.

function Outer() {
    this.inner = function() {
        this.c = "inner";
        console.log(this.c);
    }
}

var out = new Outer();
out.c;       // undefined
out.inner(); // logs "inner"
out.c;       // "inner"

More information on the new keyword and prototypes: http://pivotallabs.com/javascript-constructors-prototypes-and-the-new-keyword/

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.