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How do we create or show an error or a warning to the user the he/she can not input flags that have the opposite value of another inputted flag or to show he/she have made an invalid argument.

struct Flags
{
    enum Values
    {
        None = 0,
        Yes = 1,
        No = 2,
        Good = 4,
        Bad = 8
    };
};

void Function( __in int p_Flag )
{
    if( p_Flag & Flags::Yes )
        std::cout << "Yes\n";
    else if( p_Flag & Flags::No )
        std::cout << "No\n";

    if( p_Flag & Flags::Good )
        std::cout << "Good\n";
    else if( p_Flag & Flags::Bad )
        std::cout << "Bad\n";
};

int main( void )
{
    Function( Flags::Yes | Flags::No );         // Error/warning (not OK)
    Function( Flags::Good | Flags::Bad );       // Error/warning (not OK)
    Function( Flags::Yes | Flags::Bad );        // OK!

    return( 0 );
};

Although the first opposite flag will be chosen over the other, we should still show a warning or the error to ensure which flag that the user really needed.

Function( Flags::Yes | Flags::No );
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1  
static_assert may be worth looking at –  Trevor Hickey Feb 28 '13 at 5:36
2  
You could simply document that some flags take priority over others, i.e., the presence of A implicitly disables B. –  Ed S. Feb 28 '13 at 5:38
    
@Ed S. I shall. –  CLearner Feb 28 '13 at 5:39
    
Are you talking about compile-time warnings? –  n.m. Feb 28 '13 at 5:40
    
@n.m. Yes I am. –  CLearner Feb 28 '13 at 5:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
#include <cassert>

assert(p_Flag & (Flags::Yes|Flags::No) != (Flags::Yes|Flags::No))
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