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the example looks like this:

interface IA
{
    ICollection<IB> Bs {get;set;}
}

interface IB
{
}


public class BBase : IB
{

}

public class ABase : IA
{
    public ICollection<BBase> Bs { get; set; }
}

The question is that, when I wanted to implement the interface IA with BBase, just as I did in ABase, an error occured. Is that to say I can only use IB instead of BBase to implement the IA in ABase?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

What you need is to make IA generic:

interface IA<T> where T : IB
{
    ICollection<T> Bs { get; set; }
}

interface IB
{
}


public class BBase : IB
{

}

public class ABase : IA<BBase>
{
    public ICollection<BBase> Bs { get; set; }
}

The implementation of an interface should exactly match its definition, so in a non-generic case you are expected to have ICollection<IB> Bs {get;set;} in ABase exactly, that is it may accept any of IB implemetations.

While when the interface is generic (interface IA<T> where T : IB), it's implementation should provide any T satisfying the given constraint (i.e. here some exact implementation of IB). Consequently ABase class becomes generic as well.

For more info read:

  1. Generic Interfaces (C# Programming Guide)
  2. where (generic type constraint) (C# Reference)
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+1 - useful approach when it is acceptable. Changing interface signature to be generic may not work in all cases. –  Alexei Levenkov Feb 28 '13 at 7:28
    
@AlexeiLevenkov agree..in this very case it seems to me that the OP is only starting to design –  horgh Feb 28 '13 at 7:33
    
Thanks very much!!! –  user2118486 Feb 28 '13 at 7:42

You can't implement property by specifying different type for it - see Interfaces (C# Programming Guide):

To implement an interface member, the corresponding member of the implementing class must be public, non-static, and have the same name and signature as the interface member

In your particular case you either need to use ICollection<IB> as a type for property in ABase or follow Konstantin Vasilcov suggestion to use generic IA<T>.

If you can't go generic route consider making property in the interface 'get' - only. This way you'll be able to not provide setter in the class and validate all "add to to collection" operations by having custom methods to add item(s) to the collection.

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